The Life of Sir Walter Ralegh, Knt, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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Cadell and Davies, 1806
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Page 157 - That, since my flesh must die so soon, And want a head to dine next noon, Just at the stroke, when my veins start and spread, Set on my soul an everlasting head ! Then am I ready, like a palmer fit, To tread those blest paths which before I writ.
Page 157 - King's Attorney, Who pleads for all without degrees, And He hath angels, but no fees. And when the grand twelve-million jury Of our sins, with direful fury, Against our souls black verdicts give, Christ pleads His death, and then we live.
Page 35 - As for me, I am no more yours, nor you mine, Death hath cut us asunder; and God hath divided me from the world, and you from me.
Page 391 - Grace, certain Knowledge, and mere Motion, Given and Granted, and by these Presents, for Us, Our Heirs and Successors, do Give and Grant to the said Corporation...
Page 156 - I'll take my pilgrimage. Blood must be my body's balmer; No other balm will there be given; Whilst my soul, like quiet palmer, Travelleth towards the land of heaven; Over the silver mountains, Where spring the nectar fountains. There will I kiss The bowl of bliss; And drink mine everlasting fill Upon every milken hill. My soul will be a-dry before; But after it will thirst no more.
Page 158 - Even such is Time, which takes in trust Our youth, our joys, and all we have, And pays us but with age and dust ; Who in the dark and silent grave, When we have wandered all our ways, Shuts up the story of our days : And from which earth, and grave, and dust, The Lord shall raise me up, I trust.
Page 226 - ... than offereth it. If thou be bound for a stranger, thou art a fool; if for a merchant, thou puttest thy estate to learn to swim; if for a churchman, he hath no inheritance; if for a lawyer, he will find an...
Page 133 - ... passed already, the king having under his broad seal, " made you admiral of your fleet, and given you power of " the martial law over your officers and soldiers.
Page 51 - O generous prince, against such sycophants, in the glorious cause of liberty ; and assume an ambition worthy of you, to secure your fellow-creatures from slavery ; from a condition as much below that of brutes, as to act without reason is less miserable than to act against it ! Preserve to your future subjects the divine right of being free-agents, and to your own royal house the divine right of being their benefactors. Believe me, my prince, there is no other right can flow from God.
Page 172 - He was the most fearless of death that ever was known ; and the most resolute and confident, yet with reverence and conscience.

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