The California Earthquake of April 18, 1906: Report of the State Earthquake Investigation Commission ... (Google eBook)

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Carnegie Institution of Washington, 1908 - Earthquakes
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Page 225 - VIII. Fall of chimneys; cracks in the walls of buildings. IX. Partial or total destruction of some buildings. X. Great disasters; overturning of rocks; fissures in the surface of the earth ; mountain slides.
Page 227 - Comprises fairly general collapse of brick and frame buildings when not unusually strong; serious cracking of brick work and masonry in excellent structures; the formation of fissures, step faults, sharp compression anticlines, and broad wavelike folds in paved and asphalt-coated streets, accompanied by the ragged fissuring of asphalt, the destruction of foundation walls, and underpinning structures by the...
Page 227 - Comprises brick work and masonry badly cracked, with occasional collapse; some brick and masonry gables thrown down; frame buildings lurched or listed on fair or weak underpinning structures, with occasional falling from underpinning or collapse; general destruction of chimneys and of masonry, brick or cement veneers; considerable cracking or crushing of foundation walls. Grade D. Strong - Comprises general but not universal fall of chimneys; cracks in masonry and brick work; cracks in foundation...
Page 133 - First, points on opposite sides of the fault moved in opposite directions, those to the eastward of the fault in a southerly direction, and those to the westward in a northerly direction. Second, the displacements of all points were approximately parallel to the fault. Third, the displacements on each, side of the fault were less the greater the distance of the displaced points from the fault.
Page 161 - Scale as amended by the Commission is as follows: I. Perceptible only by delicate instruments. II. Very slight shocks noticed by few persons at rest. III. Slight shock, of which duration and direction was noted by a number of persons. IV. Moderate shock, reported by persons in motion; shaking of movable objects; cracking of ceilings. V. Smart shock generally felt; furniture shaken; some clocks stopped; some sleepers awakened. VI. Severe shock, general awakening of sleepers; stopping of clocks; some...
Page 243 - This investigation has clearly demonstrated that the amount of damage produced by the earthquake of April 18 in different parts of the city and county of San Francisco depended chiefly upon the geological character of the ground. Where the surface was solid rock the shock produced little damage; whereas upon made land great violence was manifested.
Page 9 - Miocene time in the Coast Range region was characterized by a progressive subsidence with oscillations of the coast. The Miocene sea gradually transgrest the continental margin from the southwest, and as it did so spread a formation of arkose sands and conglomerates over the greater part of the Southern Coast Ranges. This was followed, as the water deepened with progressive subsidence, by a remarkable deposit of bituminous shales
Page 235 - The concrete casing of piles was frequently broken. Wherever the intensity was high, the tendency to crack or crush near the base, as tho a sharp blow had been struck there, was notably conspicuous. In spots the streets sank bodily, certainly as much as 2 feet, probably more. Accompanying this depression, concrete basement floors were broken and arched, as if to compensate for it. The surface of the ground was deformed into waves and small open fissures were formed, especially close to the wharves....
Page 235 - Mingled with these was a considerable n number of modern, class A, office buildings. Here the fire burned fiercely and caused great havoc. .. .After the fire had past, standing walls revealed ugly, sinuous cracks, in rudely parallel systems, which were not due to fire nor to dynamite. Masonry blocks in the walls of excellent modern buildings...
Page 125 - In the earthquake of 1906. points on opposite sides of the fault moved in opposite directions ; those to the eastward of the fault in a southerly direction and those to the westward in a northerly direction Second, the displacements of all points were approximately parallel to the fault. Third, the displacements on each side of the fault were less the greater the distance from the fault.