The correspondence between Burns and Clarinda, with a memoir of mrs M'Lehose (Clarinda) ed. by W.C. M'Lehose (Google eBook)

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1843
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Page 139 - Curst be the verse, how well soe'er it flow, That tends to make one worthy man my foe, Give virtue scandal, innocence a fear, Or from the soft-eyed virgin steal a tear ! But he who hurts a harmless...
Page 273 - I'll pledge thee, Warring sighs and groans I'll wage thee. Who shall say that fortune grieves him While the star of hope she leaves him ? Me, nae cheerfu' twinkle lights me, Dark despair around benights me.
Page 210 - Who hath woe ? who hath sorrow ? who hath contentions? who hath babbling? who hath wounds without cause ? who hath redness of eyes ? They that tarry long at the wine ; they that go to seek mixed wine.
Page 254 - Who is she that looketh forth as the morning, fair as the moon, clear as the sun, and terrible as an army with banners?
Page 221 - Still sing the God of Seasons, as they roll. For me, when I forget the darling theme, Whether the blossom blows, the...
Page 209 - Each hour a mercenary crowd With richest proffers strove ; Among the rest young Edwin bow'd, But never talk'd of love. " In humble, simplest habit clad, No wealth nor power had he ; Wisdom and worth were all he had, But these were all to me.
Page 273 - Me, nae cheerfu' twinkle lights me, Dark despair around benights me. I'll ne'er blame my partial fancy; Naething could resist my Nancy; But to see her was to love her, Love but her, and love for ever. Had we never...
Page 295 - Talk not of Love, it gives me pain, For Love has been my foe: He bound me with an iron chain, And sunk me deep in woe. But Friendship's pure and lasting joys My heart was form'd to prove: There, welcome, win and wear the prize, But never talk of Love.
Page 203 - tis nought to me ; Since God is ever present, ever felt, In the void waste as in the city full ; And where He vital breathes, there must be joy.
Page 273 - Fare-thee-weel ! thou best and dearest ! Thine be ilka joy and treasure, Peace, enjoyment, love, and pleasure ! Ae fond kiss, and then we sever ! Ae fareweel, alas ! for ever ! Deep in heart-wrung tears I'll pledge thee ; Warring sighs and groans I'll wage thee.

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