The Spectator [by J. Addison and others]: with sketches of the lives of the authors, and explantory notes (Google eBook)

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Page 48 - Millions of spiritual creatures walk the earth Unseen, both when we wake, and when we sleep. All these with ceaseless praise his works behold, Both day and night. How often, from the steep Of echoing hill or thicket have we heard Celestial voices to the midnight air, Sole, or responsive each to others...
Page 38 - It was said of Socrates, that he brought Philosophy down from Heaven, to inhabit among Men; and I shall be ambitious to have it said of me, that I have brought Philosophy out of Closets and Libraries, Schools and Colleges, to dwell in Clubs and Assemblies, at Tea-Tables and in CoffeeHouses.
Page 235 - For. wit lying most in the assemblage of ideas. and putting those together with quickness and variety wherein can be found any resemblance or congruity. thereby to make up pleasant pictures and agreeable visions in the fancy: judgment. on the contrary. lies quite on the other side. in separating carefully one from another ideas wherein can be found the least difference. thereby to avoid being misled by similitude and by affinity to take one thing for another.
Page 5 - THE first of our society is a gentleman of Worcestershire, of an ancient descent, a baronet, his name Sir Roger de Coverley. His great grandfather was inventor of that famous country-dance which is called after him. All who know that shire are very well acquainted with the parts and merits of Sir Roger. He is a gentleman that is very singular in his behaviour, but his singularities proceed from his good sense, and are contradictions to the manners of the world, only as he thinks the world is in the...
Page 266 - I never heard the old song of Percy and Douglas that I found not my heart moved more than with a trumpet...
Page 267 - ... and dreadful scene of death, occasioned by the mutual feuds which reigned in the families of an English and Scotch nobleman : that he designed this for the instruction of his poem, we may learn from his four last lines, in which, after the example of the modern tragedians, he draws from it a precept for the benefit of his readers. God save the King, and bless the land In plenty, joy, and peace ; And grant henceforth that foul debate 'Twixt noblemen may cease.
Page 165 - What may this mean, That thou, dead corse, again in complete steel Revisits thus the glimpses of the moon, Making night hideous and we fools of nature So horridly to shake our disposition With thoughts beyond the reaches of our souls?
Page 180 - Men of all sorts take a pride to gird at me : the brain of this foolish-compounded clay, man, is not able to invent any thing that tends to laughter*, more than I invent, or is invented on me : I am not only witty in myself, but the cause that wit is in other men.
Page 10 - To conclude his character, where women are not concerned, he is an honest worthy man. I cannot tell whether I am to account him whom I am next to speak of as one of our company, for he visits us but seldom ; but when he does, it adds to every man else a new enjoyment of himself. He is a clergyman, a very philosophic man, of general learning, great sanctity of life, and the most exact good breeding.
Page 165 - Bring with thee airs from heaven or blasts from hell, Be thy intents wicked or charitable, Thou com'st in such a questionable shape, That I will speak to thee: I'll call thee Hamlet, King, father, royal Dane, O, answer me!

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