History of Tazewell County and Southwest Virginia: 1748-1920 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
W. C. Hill printing Company, 1920 - Tazewell County (Va.) - 700 pages
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Contents

I
3
II
15
III
58
IV
73
V
85
VI
99
VII
130
VIII
138
XIX
335
XX
353
XXI
361
XXII
370
XXIII
471
XXIV
486
XXV
496
XXVI
517

IX
155
X
171
XI
186
XII
204
XIII
218
XIV
224
XV
231
XVI
271
XVII
290
XVIII
311
XXVII
530
XXVIII
547
XXIX
563
XXX
585
XXXI
593
XXXII
599
XXXIII
606
XXXIV
657
XXXV
665
Copyright

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Popular passages

Page 520 - That all men are by nature equally free and independent, and have certain inherent rights, of which, when they enter into a state of society, they cannot by any compact deprive or divest their posterity; namely, the enjoyment of life and liberty, with the means of acquiring and possessing property, and pursuing and obtaining happiness and safety.
Page 599 - In your hands, my dissatisfied fellow-countrymen, and not in mine, is the momentous issue of civil war. The government will not assail you. You can have no conflict without being yourselves the aggressors. You have no oath registered in heaven to destroy the government, while I shall have the most solemn one to "preserve, protect, and defend it.
Page 599 - I have no purpose, directly or indirectly, to interfere with the institution of slavery in the States where it exists. I believe I have no lawful right to do so; and I have no inclination to do so.
Page 581 - On the contrary, they were at that time considered as a subordinate and inferior class of beings, who had been subjugated by the dominant race, and, whether emancipated or not, yet remained subject to their authority, and had no rights or privileges but such as those who held the power and the Government might choose to grant them.
Page 335 - ... but in fact for the purpose of raising a revenue, hath imposed rates and duties payable in these colonies, established a board of commissioners, with unconstitutional powers, and extended the jurisdiction of Courts of Admiralty, not only for collecting the said duties, but for the trial of causes merely arising within the body of a county...
Page 521 - Cultivators of the earth are the most valuable citizens. They are the most vigorous, the most independent, the most virtuous, and they are tied to their country, and wedded to its liberty and interests, by the most lusting bonds. As long, therefore, as they can find employment in this line, I would not convert them into mariners:, artisans, or anything else.
Page 336 - We will neither import nor purchase any slave imported after the first day of December next; after which time we will wholly discontinue the slave trade and will neither be concerned in it ourselves, nor will we hire our vessels, nor sell our commodities or manufactures to those who are concerned in it.
Page 600 - The power confided to me will be used to hold, occupy, and possess the property and places belonging to the Government and to collect the duties and imposts; but beyond what may be necessary for these objects, there will be no invasion, no using of force against or among the people anywhere.
Page 295 - Captain Cresap, What did you kill my people on Yellow Creek for? The white people killed my kin at Conestoga,* a great while ago; and I thought nothing of that. But you killed my kin again, on Yellow Creek, and took my cousin prisoner. Then I thought I must kill too; and I have been three times to war since: but the Indians are not angry; only myself.
Page 105 - You must take especial care that you choose a seat for habitation that shall not be over burthened with woods near your town for all the men you have shall not be able to cleanse twenty acres a year, besides that it may serve for a covert for your enemies round about.

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