Sybil

Front Cover
BiblioBazaar, Oct 8, 2007 - Fiction - 468 pages
5 Reviews
This is a pre-1923 historical reproduction that was curated for quality. Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digitization process. Though we have made best efforts - the books may have occasional errors that do not impede the reading experience. We believe this work is culturally important and have elected to bring the book back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Stevil2001 - LibraryThing

Why don't more heads of state write novels? Actually, after reading Sybil we should be thankful that they don't, since apparently Disraeli thinks it's totally legit to interrupt the narrative for ... Read full review

Review: Sybil, or the Two Nations

User Review  - Liz - Goodreads

I was expecting a political book, and I got one. The writing style might not be the greatest, and there were tendencies to melodrama. But this is a Victorian novel after all. Certainly, events were ... Read full review

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About the author (2007)

A great master of the political novel, Disraeli may be said to have originated the genre. Disraeli's early books were all romans a clef, novels in which he introduced real personages who were easily recognizable beneath fictitious names. With Coningsby (1844), Sybil (1845), and Tancred (1847), Disraeli produced his best work. All of them are political novels and more or less comprise a trilogy, since the same characters appear and reappear. In these novels Disraeli dramatized ambition, romantic egoism, and the role of the outsider, particularly the Jew, and revealed a strong sense of the social and economic problems of mid-Victorian Britain. He then gave up writing temporarily, gradually rose to be chancellor of the exchequer, and finally, prime minister from 1867 to 1868 and again from 1874 to 1880. During his second term of office, when he was knighted, he took a name from his first novel and became the first Earl of Beaconsfield. In his later years, he resumed his writing and became an intimate friend of Queen Victoria, who referred to his death as "a national calamity.

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