The Spanish Frontier in North America

Front Cover
Yale University Press, 1992 - History - 579 pages
2 Reviews
In 1513, when Ponce de Leon stepped ashore on a beach of what is now Florida, Spain gained its first foothold in North America. For the next three hundred years, Spaniards ranged through the continent building forts to defend strategic places, missions to proselytize Indians, and farms, ranches, and towns to reconstruct a familiar Iberian world. This engagingly written and well-illustrated book presents an up-to-date overview of the Spanish colonial period in North America. It provides a sweeping account not only of the Spaniards' impact on the lives, institutions, and environments of the native peoples but also of the effect of native North Americans on the societies and cultures of the Spanish settlers. With apt quotations and colorful detail, David J. Weber evokes the dramatic era of the first Spanish-Indian contact in North America, describes the establishment, expansion, and retraction of the Spanish frontier, and recounts the forging of a Hispanic empire that ranged from Florida to California. Weber refutes the common assumption that while the English and French came to the New World to settle or engage in honest trade, the Spaniards came simply to plunder. The Spanish missionaries, soldiers, and traders who lived in America were influenced by diverse motives, and Weber shows that their behavior must be viewed in the context of their own time and within their own frame of reference. Throughout his book Weber deals with many other interesting issues, including the difference between English, French, and Spanish treatment of Indians, the social and economic integration of Indian women into Hispanic society, and the reasons why Spanish communities in North America failed to developat the rate that the English settlements did. His magisterial work broadens our understanding of the American past by illuminating a neglected but integral part of the nation's heritage.
  

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Review: The Spanish Frontier in North America

User Review  - Kent - Goodreads

Although a bit dated, this is a wonderful overarching, simple, and succinct history of Spain's presence in the parts of New Spain that would become part of the United States. Read full review

Review: The Spanish Frontier in North America

User Review  - Angel - Goodreads

I remember reading this during my teaching days, but apparently lacked the time to make notes about it, since I only found in my journal a mention I read it. Overall, it is a thick history book. While the subject was interesting, the prose was very slow. Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
Castillo of San Marcos St Augustine
2
Palace of the Governors Santa Fe
3
Mission San Xavier del Bac
4
q Worlds Apart
14
The Zuni pueblo of Hawikuh Cibola
16
Santiago
21
Reckoning latitude
26
Panorama of New Orleans 1765
200
Antonio de Ulloa
201
q Indian Raiders and the Reorganization
204
Plan of El Paso 1766
208
PlanofTubac 1766
210
Carlos III 175988
215
Plan of the presidio of Santa Fe 1791
218
A soldado de cuera
219

Pictograph of Spaniards on horseback
27
Plan of the castillo de San Marcos
28
First Encounters
30
Alonso Alvarez de Pinedas Gulf of Mexico 1519
35
Diego Riberos map 1529
39
Viceroy Antonio de Mendoza
45
Zuni pueblo by Ben Wittick
47
A Timucuan queen elect
53
Map of America 1601
57
Plan of Fort Caroline 1564
61
Menendez de Aviles
62
Felipe II 155698
63
Deaths of the Spanish Jesuits in Virginia
73
Plan of Drakes attack on St Augustine 1586
76
Juan de Onates inscription at El Morro
83
Acoma pueblo
85
St Francis of Assisi
93
Conquistadores of the Spirit
97
A palisaded Timucuan town
102
The devil at the confessional
109
Exploitation Contention and Rebellion
122
Diego de Vargas
138
Our Lady of the Conquest
140
Plan to fortify the mission of Santa Catalina deGuale 1691
143
Map of Pensacola Bay 1698
157
Map of northern New Spain and the Gulf of Mexico 1717
164
Plan of villa presidio and missions of San Antonio circa 1730
165
Villasurs last stand
170
q Commercial Rivalry Stagnation
172
Plan of Los Adaes 1767
173
Destruction of Mission San Saba
190
Teodoro de Croix
225
Bernardo de Galvez
228
Spanish musket
229
A Comanche warrior
232
Jose de Galvez
238
Map of Monterey Bay 1603
245
Juan Bautista de Anza
251
Map of the Great Basin 1778
255
The presidio of San Francisco
258
A leatherjacketted soldier at Monterey
260
The presidio of Monterey
261
The Capture of Pensacola by Bernardo de Galvez
269
The governors house St Augustine
273
Dances held for Malaspina at Nootka
287
Spanish settlement at Neah Bay
288
Frontiers and Frontier Peoples Transformed
302
Blacksmith shop at Zuni pueblo
304
Caddos near Nacogdoches
305
Wife of a soldier of Monterey
315
St George Street St Augustine
318
St Francis painted on hide
319
Plan of San Antonio circa 1730
321
Plan of San Antonio 1767
322
Plan of New Orleans 1801
323
Plan of Santa Fe 1766
324
The Spanish Legacy
335
Abbreviations
361
Select Bibliography
496
Index
555
Copyright

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About the author (1992)

David J. Weber is Professor and Chairman of the Department of History at Southern Methodist University. He has thought at San Diego State University, at the University of Costa Rica as a Fulbright -Hays Lecturer, and in Spain and Mexico. He is author or editor of nine books and many articles on the American Southwest.

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