The Whole History of Grandfather?

Front Cover
The Minerva Group, Inc., Apr 1, 2002 - History - 216 pages
3 Reviews
In writing this ponderous tome, the author's desire has been to describe the eminent characters and remarkable events of our early annals by relating the adventures to a chair. The chair is made to pass from one to another of whom he thought it most desirable for the young reader to have vivid and familiar ideas, and whose lives and actions would best enable him to give picturesque sketches of the times. On its sturdy oaken legs it trudges diligently from one scene to another, and seems always to thrust itself in the way, with most benign complacency, whenever an historical personage happens to be looking for a seat.
  

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Review: The Whole History of Grandfather's Chair

User Review  - Lynn - Goodreads

Interesting way to teach history; unfortunately it often put me to sleep. Read full review

Review: The Whole History of Grandfather's Chair

User Review  - Darcy - Goodreads

I didn't realize Nathaniel Hawthorne was so into early American History. I enjoyed learning about the early colonists from the perspective of a historian living in the 1800's rather than from the perspective of modern historians. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
5
Section 2
9
Section 3
12
Section 4
27
Section 5
43
Section 6
56
Section 7
62
Section 8
70
Section 15
120
Section 16
130
Section 17
136
Section 18
142
Section 19
145
Section 20
151
Section 21
160
Section 22
166

Section 9
74
Section 10
83
Section 11
89
Section 12
96
Section 13
106
Section 14
111
Section 23
173
Section 24
186
Section 25
193
Section 26
200
Section 27
208
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Nathaniel Hawthorne was born on July 4, 1804 in Salem, Massachusetts. When he was four years old, his father died. Years later, with financial help from his maternal relatives who recognized his literary talent, Hawthorne was able to enroll in Bowdoin College. Among his classmates were the important literary and political figures Horatio Bridge, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, and Franklin Pierce. These friends supplied Hawthorne with employment during the early years after graduation while Hawthorne was still establishing himself as a legitimate author. Hawthorne's first novel, Fanshawe, which he self-published in 1828, wasn't quite the success that he had hoped it would be. Not willing to give up, he began writing stories for Twice-Told Tales. These stories established Hawthorne as a leading writer. In 1842, Hawthorne moved to Concord, Massachusetts, where he wrote a number of tales, including "Rappaccini's Daughter" and "Young Goodman Brown," that were later published as Mosses from an Old Manse. The overall theme of Hawthorne's novels was a deep concern with ethical problems of sin, punishment, and atonement. No one novel demonstrated that more vividly than The Scarlet Letter. This tale about the adulterous Puritan Hester Prynne is regarded as Hawthorne's best work and is a classic of American literature. Other famous novels written by Hawthorne include The House of Seven Gables and The Blithedale Romance. In 1852, Hawthorne wrote a campaign biography of his college friend Franklin Pierce. After Pierce was elected as President of the United States, he rewarded Hawthorne with the Consulship at Liverpool, England. Hawthorne died in his sleep on May 19, 1864, while on a trip with Franklin Pierce.

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