The Morality of Happiness (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Oxford University Press, Aug 19, 1993 - Self-Help - 512 pages
3 Reviews
Ancient ethical theories, based on the notions of virtue and happiness, have struck many as an attractive alternative to modern theories. But we cannot find out whether this is true until we understand ancient ethics--and to do this we need to examine the basic structure of ancient ethical theory, not just the details of one or two theories. In this book, Annas brings together the results of a wide-ranging study of ancient ethical philosophy and presents it in a way that is easily accessible to anyone with an interest in ancient or modern ethics. She examines the fundamental notions of happiness and virtue, the role of nature in ethical justification and the relation between concern for self and concern for others. Her careful examination of the ancient debates and arguments shows that many widespread assumptions about ancient ethics are quite mistaken. Ancient ethical theories are not egoistic, and do not depend for their acceptance on metaphysical theories of a teleological kind. Most centrally, they are recognizably theories of morality, and the ancient disputes about the place of virtue in happiness can be seen as akin to modern disputes about the demands of morality.
  

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Contents

Making Sense of My Life as a Whole
27
The Virtues
47
2 The Affective Aspect of Virtue
53
3 The Intellectual Aspect of Virtue
66
Rules and Insight
84
5 Virtue and Right Action
108
6 Ordinary and Extraordinary Virtue
115
7 Virtue and Morality
120
2 Epicurus on Justice
293
Natural Law and the Depoliticized Outlook
302
4 Aristotelian Theories
312
5 Conclusion
320
SelfInterest and Morality
322
Revising Your Priorities
327
Happiness Success and What Matters
329
Epicurus Virtue Pleasure and Time
334

Justification and the Appeal to Nature
133
Nature and Naturalism
135
Aristotle Nature and Mere Nature
142
The Stoics Human Nature and the Point of View of the Universe
159
Antiochus The Intuitive View
180
The Epicureans Rethinking What Is Natural
188
The Sceptics Accepting What Is Natural
201
1 Pyrrho
203
2 The Sceptical Academy
205
Sextus
207
Uses of Nature
214
The Good Life and the Good Lives of Others
221
The Good of Others
223
Finding Room for OtherConcern
227
2 Epicurus
236
3 The Sceptics
244
SelfConcern and the Sources and Limits of OtherConcern
249
2 The Stoics on OtherConcern and Impartiality
262
3 The Aristotelian Response
276
4 The Debate
288
Justice
291
The Sceptics Untroubledness without Belief
351
Aristotle An Unstable View
364
Theophrastus and the Stoics Forcing the Issue
385
2 The Stoics
388
Aristotelian Responses
412
1 Aristotles School
413
2 Arius Didymus Account of Aristotelian Ethics
415
3 Antiochus
419
Happiness and the Demands of Virtue
426
Conclusion
437
Morality Ancient and Modern
439
1 The Shape of Ancient Ethical Theory
440
2 The Tasks of Ethical Theory
442
3 Structural Contrasts
446
4 Ancient Ethics and Modern Morality
452
Cast of Characters
457
Primary Sources
465
Secondary Sources
469
Index Locorum
484
General Index
494
Copyright

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Page 4 - ... imperatives' and disagreeable duties, and that without these you have not got morality. We have seen, and have yet to see, that the first has grasped only part of the truth; and on the second it is sufficient to remark that it stands and falls with the identification of morality with unwilling obedience to law, and that, according to the common view, a man does not cease to be good so...

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