The Bohemian Jinks: A Treatise (Google eBook)

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Bohemian Club, 1908 - Theater - 137 pages
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Page 46 - Ye who love a nation's legends, Love the ballads of a people, That like voices from afar off Call to us to pause and listen, Speak in tones so plain and childlike, Scarcely can the ear distinguish Whether they are sung or spoken...
Page 38 - Juno, in a glorious throne of gold, circled with comets and fiery meteors, engendered in that hot and dry region ; her feet reaching to the lowest : where was made a rainbow, and within it musicians seated, figuring airy spirits, their habits various, and resembling the several colours caused in that part of the air by reflection. The midst was all dark and condensed clouds, as being the proper place, where rain, hail, and other watery meteors are made...
Page 1 - Beyond them is a stage innocent of scenery except that supplied [2] by Nature. On either side of this stage two immense trees forming the proscenium stretch upward into the greater darkness overhead, where the black masses of their foliage, mingling with the foliage of their fellows, are vaguely outlined against an indigo sky. On all sides great trunks — ten, fifteen feet in diameter, two hundred, three hundred feet in height — tower aloft.
Page 38 - Reason, with the splendor of her crown, illumined the •whole grot On the sides of this, which began the other part, were placed two great statues, feigned of gold, one of Atlas, the other of Hercules, <in varied postures, bearing up the clouds, which were of relievo, embossed, and traluceut* as naturals: to these a cortine of painted clouds joined, which reached to the utmost roof of the hall...
Page 1 - ... scenery except that supplied by Nature. The only lights are the few needed by the orchestra. About six to seven hundred spectators are present. The stage is between two gigantic trees, the tops of which lose themselves in the darkness of the heavens above. " On all sides," writes one who knows,1 " great trunks — ten, fifteen feet in diameter, two hundred, three hundred feet in height — tower aloft. At the back of the stage is an abrupt hillside covered with a dense growth of shrubs and small...
Page 38 - ... figuring airy spirits, their habits various, and resembling the several colours caused in that part of the air by reflection. The midst was all of dark and condensed clouds, as being the proper place where rain, hail, and other watery meteors are .made ; out of which two concave clouds from the rest thrust forth themselves (in nature of those Nimbi, wherein, by Homer, Virgil, &c., the gods are...
Page 37 - MIKPOKOSMO2, or globe, filled with countries, and those gilded ; where the sea was exprest, heightened with silver waves. This stood, or rather hung (for no axle was seen to support it...
Page 16 - A rugged trail, concealed by underbrush, ascends the inclined portion of the stage in a zigzag course to a point over a hundred feet in a straight line from the lowest platform, and at an elevation above it of some sixty feet. . . . The hillside is a natural sounding board, and the acoustics of the place are so good that words spoken in a normal tone from the highest point on the trail, by a person whose voice has ordinary carrying power, can be distinctly heard at the back of the auditorium glade.
Page 38 - To these a curtain of painted clouds joined, which reached to the utmost roof of the hall, and suddenly opening, revealed the three regions of air, in the highest of which sat Juno in a glorious throne of gold, circled with comets and fiery meteors, "engendered in that hot and dry region ; her feet reaching to the lowest, where there was a rainbow,
Page 89 - For lasting happiness we turn our eyes to one alone, And she surrounds you now. Great nature, refuge of the weary heart) and only balm to breasts that have been bruised. She hath cool hands for every fevered brow And gentlest silence for the troubled soul.

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