The Last Gamble: Betting on the Future in Four Rocky Mountain Mining Towns

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University of Arizona Press, 1998 - History - 221 pages
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When gambling was initiated in Deadwood, South Dakota, in 1989 and in three Colorado towns two years later, most residents imagined that the new tourist attraction would bolster the tawdry main streets of these "Old West" mining towns. Instead, gaming limited employment options, threatened historical preservation, and transformed the tax structure as it became the dominant industry in these towns. From the onset of legalized gambling in the Rocky Mountains, authors Katherine Jensen and Audie Blevins collected economic data, interviewed officials and citizens, and perused countless historical sources. Their efforts have resulted in a unique account detailing the dramatic changes in communities that stake their economic and cultural futures solely on the gambling industry. Jensen and Blevins offer readers clear insight into the dilemmas faced by the four communities, a clarity that is powerfully enhanced by their personal ties to the people and places. The Last Gamble is an intriguing work that will appeal to all readers with an interest in the modern American West and will prove especially valuable to policymakers, preservationists, historians, and sociologists.

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Contents

Race Gender and Class in the Legacy of the Gamble
27
Stagnation and Decay in Retrospect
54
Lace House in Black Hawk
67
Copyright

9 other sections not shown

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About the author (1998)

Jensen teaches sociology at the University of Wyoming.

Blevins teaches sociology at the University of Wyoming

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