Teleportation: The Impossible Leap

Front Cover
John Wiley & Sons, Apr 29, 2005 - Science - 288 pages
7 Reviews
An authoritative, entertaining examination of the ultimate thrill ride
Until recently the stuff of sci-fi fiction and Star Trek reruns, teleportation has become a reality-for subatomic particles at least. In this eye-opening book, science author David Darling follows the remarkable evolution of teleportation, visiting the key labs that have cradled this cutting-edge science and relating the all-too-human stories behind its birth. He ties in the fast emerging fields of cryptography and quantum computing, tackles some thorny philosophical questions (for instance, can a soul be teleported?), and asks when and how humans may be able to "beam up."
  

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Review: Teleportation: The Impossible Leap

User Review  - Matthew - Goodreads

I read this book in one day. Teleportation: The Impossible Leap was written in a very clear style that communicated the complexities of elementary quantum physics to the lay reader. Me. Not that I ... Read full review

Review: Teleportation: The Impossible Leap

User Review  - Jeff Price - Goodreads

So dry, but a good page flipper. Read full review

Contents

Prologue
1
Introduction A Brief History of Beaming Up
5
Chapter 1 Light Readings
17
Chapter 2 Ghosts in the Material World
53
Chapter 3 The Mysterious Link
83
Chapter 4 Dataverse
103
Chapter 5 Secret Communications
131
Chapter 6 A Miracle in Montreal
155
Chapter 8 A Computer without Bounds
189
Chapter 9 Atoms Molecules Microbes
213
Chapter 10 Farfetched and Farreaching
231
Epilogue
253
Chronology
257
References
261
Bibliography
267
Index
269

Chapter 7 Small Steps and Quantum Leaps
167

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About the author (2005)

DAVID DARLING, Ph.D., is the author of several other narrative science titles, including Equations of Eternity, a New York Times Notable Book, and Deep Time. He is also the author of The Universal Book of Mathematics, The Universal Book of Astronomy, and The Complete Book of Spaceflight, all from Wiley, as well as more than thirty children's books. His articles and reviews have appeared in Astronomy, Omni, Penthouse, New Scientist, the New York Times, and the Guardian, among others. He lives near Dundee, Scotland.

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