Filmosophy

Front Cover
Wallflower Press, 2006 - Performing Arts - 254 pages
2 Reviews

Filmosophy is a provocative new manifesto for a radically philosophical way of understanding cinema. It coalesces twentieth-century ideas of film as thought (from Hugo Münsterberg to Gilles Deleuze) into a practical theory of "film-thinking," arguing that film style conveys poetic ideas through a constant dramatic "intent" about the characters, spaces, and events of film. Discussing contemporary filmmakers such as Béla Tarr and the Dardenne brothers, this timely contribution to the study of film and philosophy will provoke debate among audiences and filmmakers alike.

FILMOSOPHY ® is a registered U.S. trademark owned by Valentin Stoilov (www.filmosophy.com) for educational services in the field of motion picture history theory and production. Mr. Stoilov is not the source or origin of this book and has not sponsored or endorsed it or its author.

  

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Review: Filmosophy

User Review  - Tuğrul - Goodreads

It's a book about a new film-approach based on how we percieve the films. According to the writer, each viewer has it's own understanding about the film, and this creates a film-mind, you become a ... Read full review

Review: Filmosophy

User Review  - Matthew Holtmeier - Goodreads

Provides a new, poetic way of understanding film, which I believe will help move us past interpretive roadblocks that past discourses on cinema have created. Actually fairly light on the academic-ness ... Read full review

Contents

film minds
15
filmbeings
27
film phenomenology
39
film neominds
49
part two
71
filmind
73
film narration
103
filmthinking
116
filmgoer
148
film writing
169
filmosophy
183
conclusion
204
notes
214
bibliography
239
index
248
Copyright

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Page 1 - LAST NIGHT i WAS in the Kingdom of Shadows. If you only knew how strange it is to be there. It is a world without sound, without colour. Everything there — the earth, the trees, the people, the water and the air — is dipped in monotonous grey. Grey rays of the sun across the grey sky, grey eyes in grey faces, and the leaves of the trees are ashen grey. It is not life but its shadow, it is not motion but its soundless spectre.

About the author (2006)

Daniel Frampton is a London-based writer and filmmaker and the founding editor of the online salon-journal, Film-Philosophy.com.

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