History of the American Troops, During the Late War, Under the Command of Cols. Fenton and Campbell: Giving an Account of the Crossing of the Lake from Erie to Long Point; Also, the Crossing of Niagara by the Troops Under Gens. Gaines, Brown, Scott and Porter. The Taking of Fort Erie, the Battle of Chippewa, the Imprisonment of Col. Bull, Major Galloway and the Author (then a Captian) and Their Treatment; Together with an Historical Account of the Canadas (Google eBook)

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George P. Humphrey, 1896 - Canada - 107 pages
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Page 11 - Strange as it may appear, it is not the less true, that on the very day after the British came to Dover, they burnt all the houses we had left standing, and even hung the poor old fellow whom we had had in custody.
Page 107 - The effect from the summit of the cliff is awfully grand and sublime. The prodigious depth of the descent of the waters of this surprising fall ; the brightness and volubility of their course ; the swiftness of their movement through the air ; and the loud and hollow noise emitted from the basin, swelling with incessant agitation from the weight of the dashing waters...
Page 94 - Let go three bullets together, stop the first at one second, and it will have fallen sixteen feet; stop the next at the end of the second second, it will have fallen, four times sixteen, or sixty-four feet; stop the last at the end of the third second and the distance it will have fallen will be nine times sixteen or one hundred and forty-four feet, and so on. Now the momentum or force with which a falling body strikes, is equal to its weight multiplied by its velocity...
Page 72 - ... parents' wish ; while others, of the younger class, were sobbing out their lamentations at the thoughts of what their mothers and sisters suffered after knowing of their imprisonment. Not unfrequently the whole night was spent in this way ; and when, about daybreak, the weary prisoner fell into a doze, he was waked from his slumber by the grinding noise of the locks, and the unbarring of the doors, with the cry of 'Turn out! All out!
Page 107 - It is precipitated in an almost perpendicular direction, over a rock of the height of two hundred and forty-six feet, falling, where it touches the rock, in white clouds of rolling foam, and underneath, where it is propelled with uninterrupted gravitation, in numerous flakes, like wool or cotton, which are gradually protracted in their descent, until they are received into the boiling, profound abyss, below.
Page 107 - ... received into the boiling, profound abyss, below. Viewed from the summit of the cliff, from whence they are thrown, the waters, with every concomitant circumstance, produce an effect awfully grand, and wonderfully sublime. The prodigious depth of their descent, the brightness and volubility of their course, the swiftness of their movement through the air, and the loud and hollow noise emitted from the basin, swelling with incessant agitation from the weight of the dashing waters, forcibly combine...
Page 71 - Some were cursing and execrating their oppressors ; others, late at night, were relating their adventures to a new prisoner; others lamenting their aberrations from rectitude and disobedience to parents and headstrong wilfulness, that drove them to sea, contrary to their parents' wish, while others, of the younger class, were sobbing out their lamentations at the thoughts of what their mothers and sisters suffered after knowing of their imprisonment. Not unfrequently the whole night was spent in...
Page 98 - Canada produces, among others, two forts of pines, the white and the red ; four forts of firs ; two forts of cedar and oak, the white and the red ; the male and female maple ; three forts...
Page 5 - Command of Colonels Fenton and Campbell, giving an account of the crossing of the Lake from Erie to Long Point; also, the crossing of Niagara by the troops...
Page 19 - Chippewa, and drawn up their forces under cover of a piece of woods, near the Niagara River, and running parallel with the Chippewa Creek, directly across the creek, where the British batteries commanded the same position. Driving the Indians rapidly through the woods, we at length came in full contact with the British regular line, which, in conjunction with the batteries, opened a most tremendous fire. From the clouds of dust and heavy firing, General Brown concluded that the entire force of the...

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