How to Conduct Productive Meetings (Google eBook)

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American Society for Training and Development, Jan 1, 2006 - Business & Economics - 140 pages
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Legendary evaluation guru Donald Kirkpatrick offers solid and timely advice to ensure that a meeting is necessary, the presentation is professional and effective, the participants contribute in constructive ways, and the outcome is measurable. He includes over 130 dos and don'ts of meetings and provides guidance on how to use questions in meetings, how to conduct a productive training meeting, how to conduct a problem-solving meeting, and how to be an effective participant in a meeting. Pre- and posttests allow users to examine their baseline knowledge of successful meetings and evaluate lessons learned from the book.
  

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Contents

How to Determine When a Meeting Is Necessary and Productive
1
The Costs and Causes of a Nonproductive Meeting
7
How to Coordinate a Meeting
13
How to Prepare for a Meeting
21
The Role of the Leader
29
The QuestionUses and Misuses
33
How to Present Information Effectively
37
How to Get and Maintain Enthusiastic Involvement
45
Posttest
95
Answers to Pretest and Posttest
99
A Final Word
101
Appendix A Practical Tips from Experienced Meeting Leaders
103
Appendix B After the Meeting What Then?
109
How to Contribute as a Participant
113
Dos and Donts for Conducting Meetings
119
Appendix E Murphys Law at Meetings
127

How to Control and Conclude a Meeting
49
How to Conduct a Productive Training Meeting
61
How to Conduct a ProblemSolving Meeting
73
How to Evaluate and Improve a Meeting
81
References
133
About the Author
135
Index
137
Copyright

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Page 7 - MacKenzie (1973), a time management expert, identified 15 time wasters that afflict administrators: 1 . Telephone interruptions 2. Visitors dropping in without appointments 3. Meetings, both scheduled and unscheduled 4. Crisis situations for which no plans were possible 5. Lack of objectives, priorities and deadlines 6. Cluttered desk and personal disorganization 7. Involvement in routine and detail that should be delegated to others 8. Attempting too much at once and underestimating the time it...
Page 7 - Wasters 1 . Telephone interruptions 2. Drop-in visitors 3 . Meetings (both scheduled and unscheduled) 4. Crises 5. Lack of objectives, priorities and deadlines 6. Cluttered desk and personal disorganization 7. Ineffective delegation and involvement in routine and detail 8. Attempting too much at once and unrealistic time estimates 9. Lack of, or unclear communication and instructions 10. Inadequate, inaccurate and delayed information 11. Indecision and procrastination 12. Confused responsibility...

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