Complete Poems and Major Prose

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John Milton, Merritt Yerkes Hughes
Hackett Publishing, 2003 - Poetry - 1059 pages
15 Reviews
First published by Odyssey Press in 1957, this classic edition provides Milton's poetry and major prose works, richly annotated, in a sturdy and affordable clothbound volume.
  

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User Review  - jsburbidge - LibraryThing

This is pretty well the standard edition of Milton, with a critically established text, a reasonable level of apparatus for non-expert readers, and a critical mass of Milton's work extending beyond his major works to everything that anyone who is not a specialist is likely to need. Read full review

Review: Complete Poems and Major Prose

User Review  - Doug DePalma - Goodreads

It is a very useful text for its purpose in Milton surveys at the undergraduate level. Past that, the footnotes are at times intrusive and coercive. Hughes footnotes some passages and ignores others that are just as deserving, leading the reader to believe there is an agenda at play. Read full review

Contents

Poems
2
Canzone
54
The Passion
61
LAllegro
68
How Soon Hath Time
76
Ad Patrem To His Father
82
Psalm CXIV
114
Ad Salsillum Poetam Romanum Aegrotantem To Salzilli
125
PARADISE LOST
173
Introc luctic i73 Book I
211
Book II
232
Book III
257
Book IV
277
Book V
302
Book VI
323
Book VII
345

Ad Eandem To the Same
131
Translations from Of Reformation Touching Church Disci
139
On the Religious Memory of Mrs Catharine Thomason My Christian Friend Deceased 16 December
145
Ad Ioannem Rousium To John Rouse Oxoniensis Aca demiae Bibliothecarium Librarian of Oxford University
146
Psalm LXXX
149
Psalm LXXXI
151
Psalm LXXXII
152
Psalm LXXXIII
153
Psalm LXXXIV
154
Psalm LXXXV
155
Psalm LXXXVI
156
Psalm LXXXVII
157
Psalm LXXXVIII
158
On the Lord General Fairfax at the Siege of Colchester
159
In Sal masii Hundredam Against the Hundred of Salmasius
160
To Sir Henry Vane the Younger
161
Psalm I
162
Psalm III
163
Psalm V
164
Psalm VI
165
Psalm VIII
167
When I Consider
168
Cyriack Whose Grandsire
169
To Mr Cyriack Skinner upon His Blindness
170
Book VIII
362
Book IX
378
Book X
406
Book XI
423
Book XII
454
PARADISE REGAINED
471
SAMSON AGONISTES
531
Prose
595
OF EDUCATION
630
THE REASON OF CHURCH GOVERNMENT URGED AGAINST
640
AN APOLOGY FOR SMECTYMNUUS SELECTIONS
690
THE DOCTRINE AND DISCIPLINE OF DIVORCE SELECTIONS
696
AREOPAGITICA
716
THE TENURE OF KINGS AND MAGISTRATES
750
EIKONOKLASTES SELECTIONS
781
THE SECOND DEFENSE OF THE PEOPLE OF ENGLAND
817
A TREATISE OF CIVIL POWER IN ECCLESIASTICAL CAUSES
839
CONSIDERATIONS TOUCHING THE LIKELIEST MEANS TO
856
THE READY AND EASY WAY TO ESTABLISH A FREE COMMON
880
THE CHRISTIAN DOCTRINE SELECTIONS
900
Appendix
1021
INDEX OF NAMES
1045
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

John Milton, English scholar and classical poet, is one of the major figures of Western literature. He was born in 1608 into a prosperous London family. By the age of 17, he was proficient in Latin, Greek, and Hebrew. Milton attended Cambridge University, earning a B.A. and an M.A. before secluding himself for five years to read, write and study on his own. It is believed that Milton read evertything that had been published in Latin, Greek, and English. He was considered one of the most educated men of his time. Milton also had a reputation as a radical. After his own wife left him early in their marriage, Milton published an unpopular treatise supporting divorce in the case of incompatibility. Milton was also a vocal supporter of Oliver Cromwell and worked for him. Milton's first work, Lycidas, an elegy on the death of a classmate, was published in 1632, and he had numerous works published in the ensuing years, including Pastoral and Areopagitica. His Christian epic poem, Paradise Lost, which traced humanity's fall from divine grace, appeared in 1667, assuring his place as one of the finest non-dramatic poet of the Renaissance Age. Milton went blind at the age of 43 from the incredible strain he placed on his eyes. Amazingly, Paradise Lost and his other major works, Paradise Regained and Samson Agonistes, were composed after the lost of his sight. These major works were painstakingly and slowly dictated to secretaries. John Milton died in 1674.

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