The Secrets of Mariko: A Year in the Life of a Japanese Woman and Her Family (Google eBook)

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Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Sep 29, 2010 - Social Science - 368 pages
21 Reviews
With Bumiller's intimate, beautifully written portrait of a middle-class Tokyo housewife, readers finally penetrate the mysteries of the Japanese people to see how they differ from us, and how they are alike.


From the Hardcover edition.
  

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Review: The Secrets of Mariko: A Year in the Life of a Japanese Woman and Her Family

User Review  - Carolyn Bruce - Goodreads

The life of a Japanese housewife through the eyes of an American journalist. Mariko's honesty allows readers to see the modern world of everyday Tokyo life by following mother of three and wife of a salaryman. Read full review

Review: The Secrets of Mariko: A Year in the Life of a Japanese Woman and Her Family

User Review  - Charles M. - Goodreads

Very revealing look of life of a Japanese woman and her society during the 1990s. Dis-spells many myths about the extravagant wealth and high standards lifestyle of the Japanese. Turns out that Japan has as many societal ills as does USA. Read full review

Contents

From a Great Distance
3
Memories of War 3 1
31
3 I Forget Im a Housewife
65
The Festival of the Dead
91
The Pleasures of Summer
111
Back to School
141
Neighborhood Politics
179
Scenes from a Marriage
199
The Gingko Trees
223
Crisis
253
Marikos Secret
285
A Iapanese Life 3 11
333
Selected Bibliography
335
7
337
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Elisabeth Bumiller, a Washington reporter for "The New York Times," was a "Times" White House correspondent from September 10, 2001, to 2006. She is the author of "May You Be the Mother of a Hundred Sons: A Journey Among the Women of India "and T"he Secrets of Mariko: A Year in the Life of a Japanese Woman and Her Family." She wrote much of this book as a public policy scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center and as a transatlantic fellow at the German Marshall Fund of the United States. She lives in the Washington, D.C., area with her husband, Steven R. Weisman, and two children.

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