Fields of Protest: Women's Movements in India

Front Cover
Zubaan, 2000 - Feminism - 217 pages
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The women's movement in India has a long and rich history in which millions of ordinary women live, work, and struggle to survive in order to remake their family, home, and social lives. Whether fighting for safe contraception, literacy, water, and electricity or resisting sexual harassment, a vibrant and active women's movement is thriving in many parts of India today.

Fields of Protest explores the political and cultural circumstances under which groups of women organize. Starting with Bombay and Calcutta, Raka Ray discusses the creation of "political fields" -- structured, unequal, and socially constructed political environments within which organizations exist, flourish, or fail. In other words, women's organizations are not autonomous or free agents; rather, they inherit a "field" and its accompanying social relations, and when they act, they act in response to it and within it. Drawing on the literature of both social movements and feminism, Ray analyzes the striking differences between the movements in these two cities.

Using an innovative and comparative perspective, Ray offers a unique look at Indian activist women and adds a new dimension to the study of women's movements on a global level.

  

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Review: Fields of Protest: Women's Movements in India

User Review  - Katie - Goodreads

Ray offers a view of a few different communities in India and presents what the women are interested in, organizing for, and up against. Read full review

Contents

Womens Movements and Political Fields
1
From Lived Experiences to Political Action
22
Calcutta A Hegemonic Political Field
45
Negotiating a Homogeneous Political Culture
63
Domination and Subordination in Calcutta
84
Bombay A Fragmented Political Field
102
Coexistence in a Heterogeneous Political Culture
121
Domination and Subordination in Bombay
140
Identity Autonomy the State and Womens Movements
159
Methodological Appendixes
169
Notes
179
Bibliography
191
Index
211
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