Gone-Away Lake

Front Cover
Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1987 - Cousins - 192 pages
135 Reviews
Portia and her cousin Julian discover summer adventure in a hidden colony of forgotten summer houses on the shores of a swampy lake.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
66
4 stars
45
3 stars
22
2 stars
1
1 star
1

Review: Gone-Away Lake (Gone-Away Lake #1)

User Review  - Carolyn - Goodreads

Found this author during my read of the Happiness Project by Rubin and am so glad I did. Was able to read this delicious little novel (for kids) on two of the most beautiful days of the summer while ... Read full review

Review: Gone-Away Lake (Gone-Away Lake #1)

User Review  - Leslie Lamb - Goodreads

I thought this story was going to lead them to a land of little people or something. It led them to old houses that had been left, a dried up lake, and 2 people: Minniehaha and her brother. They have fun going through the old houses and talking with the people and becoming friends. Read full review

Contents

The Beginning of It All
13
The Stone and the Swamp
25
GoneAway
56
Copyright

10 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1987)

Elizabeth Enright was born in Oak Park, IL, on September 17, 1909. Her stories do not hide nor dwell on the pain, conflicts and disappointments of childhood but celebrate the joy, pleasure and love that are families. In 1939, Thimble Summer was awarded the Newbery Medal. Gone Away Lake gained three top honors over the years. In 1957 the book received the New York Herald Tribune's children's Spring Book Festival Award. It was also a 1958 Newbery Honor Book. In 1963, the American Library Association named Gone-Away Lake as the U.S. nominee for the international Hans Christian Anderson Award. In 1996, Enright was posthumously awarded a LLD degree by Nasson College.

Children's book illustrator Beth Krush was born in Washington. She graduated from what is now the University of the Arts in 1939. She illustrated books both with and without her husband Joe Krush. They are best known for their work on the American edition of the five-book series The Borrowers by Mary Norton. In 1980, they received the Drexel Citation, which is given each year to a regional children's book author or illustrator. She also illustrated The Shoe Bird by Eudora Welty. She taught at Moore College of Art for 22 years. She died from complications following a stroke on February 2, 2009 at the age of 90.

Krush, along with his wife, Beth, has created illustrations for an impressive list of children's books.

Bibliographic information