Handbooks for the Study of Sanskrit, Volume 4 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Friedrich Max Müller
Longmans, Green and Company, 1866 - Sanskrit language
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Contents

346 First and second aorist
179
349 Rules for desideratives inten sives c
181
353 Mi mi dt It
182
Paradigms
183
Second aorist
187
Verbs which take the second aorist in the Far only
188
Reduplicated second aorist
189
Compensation between base and reduplicative syllable
190
with double consonants
191
CHAPTER XIV Future Conditional Periphrastic Future and Benedictive 381 Future
192
386 Bases ending in ay 195 387 Weakening in benedictive Pa rasmaipada strengthening in benedictive Atmanepada
195
Weakening of base before y
196
Verbs which take Samprasd rana
197
Other verbs which take Sam prasdrana
198
Weakening of base Paradigm
199
The aorist passive
200
Irregular forms
201
Aorist passive of intransitive verbs
203
Participle future Parasmaipada
204
fect Atmanepada
205
Participle future Atmanepada
206
I The terminations tah and tvd with intermediate i
207
Final nasal dropt before tah and tvd
208
0 and chho take i or d
209
Participles in nah
210
Gerund in ya
211
Verbal Adjectives 453 Verbal adjectives Kritya
212
Adjectives in ya
213
Exceptional verbal adjectives in ya and tya
214
Verbal adverbs in am
215
Conjugation of causative verbs
219
Desiderative Verbs 467 Desiderative bases how formed 220 468 Desiderative bases how con jugated 220 469 Desiderative bases with or without inter...
220
Desiderative bases treated as Bhu verbs 222 473 Reduplication of desiderative bases 222 474 Bases in av and do 222 475 Sru iru dm pru plu chyu 2...
222
477 Exceptional forms
223
Verbs which insert nt
225
Prepositions
231
Exceptional determinative
237
167
244
APPENDIX
245
Final ri before consonants
308

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 11 - Sanskrit allows of no hiatus in a sentence. If a word ends in a vowel, and the next word begins with a vowel, the two vowels coalesce, according to certain rules.
Page vi - Colebrooke, the system of native grammarians, and adopts nearly the whole of their technical terminology. The grammatical system elaborated by native grammarians is, in itself, most perfect ; and those who have tested Panini's work, will readily admit that there is no grammar in any language that could vie with the wonderful mechanism of his eight books of grammatical rules.
Page 139 - Sanskrit grammarians have divided all verbs into ten classes, according to certain modifications which their roots undergo before the terminations of the Present, the Imperfect, the Optative, and Imperative. This division is very useful, and will be retained with some slight alterations. One and the same root may belong to different classes. Thus...
Page 2 - Samskrita (tl^irt) means what is rendered fit or perfect. But Sanskrit is not called so because the Brahmans, or still less, because the first Europeans who became acquainted with it, considered it the most perfect of all languages. Samskrita meant what is rendered fit for sacred purposes ; hence purified, sacred. A vessel that is purified, a sacrificial victim that is properly dressed, a man who has passed through all the initiatory rites or samskdras; all these are called samskrita.
Page 1 - Thomas, vol. np 42.) To admit, however, the independent invention of a native Indian alphabet is impossible. Alphabets were never invented, in the usual sense of that word. They were formed gradually, and purely phonetic alphabets always point back to earlier, syllabic or ideographic, stages.
Page 137 - HiiMrt krodham vinayate, he turns away or dismisses wrath ; a subtle distinction which it is possible to appreciate when stated, but difficult to bring under any general rules. Again, in Sanskrit as well as in Greek, some verbs are middle in certain tenses only, but active or middle in others ; eg Atm.
Page 62 - Sanskrit nouns have three genders, Masculine, Feminine, and Neuter ; three numbers, Singular, Dual, and Plural ; and eight cases, Nominative, Accusative, Instrumental, Dative, Ablative, Genitive, Locative, and Vocative.
Page 20 - НЧ(Я> tdhyah prayatnah, mode of articulation at the close of the utterance of the sound, which produces the qualities of surd, sonant, aspirated, and unaspirated, as explained in § 58, 59. t Some grammarians differ in their description of the degrees of closing or opening of the organs. Some...
Page 51 - The final ^ h or \ffh, after losing its aspiration, becomes i[g, which is further changed to 4j k. § 114. Nominal or verbal bases ending in consonants and followed by terminations consisting of a single consonant, drop the termination altogether, two consonants not being tolerated at the end of a word ($ 55). The final consonants of the base are then treated like other final consonants.
Page 19 - Before we can examine the changes of final and initial consonants, according to the rules of external Sandhi, we have to explain what is meant by the place and the quality of consonants. 1. The throat, the palate, the roof of the palate, the teeth, the lips, and the nose are called the places or organs of the letters. See § 4. 2. By contact between the tongue and the four places, — throat, palate, roof, teeth, — the guttural, palatal, lingual, and dental consonants are formed. Labial consonants...

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