A Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland, Enjoying Territorial Possessions Or High Official Rank: But Uninvested with Heritable Honours, Volume 4 (Google eBook)

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Henry Colburn, 1838 - Heraldry
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Vol. 4

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Page 428 - Lord Protector of the Commonwealth of England, Scotland and Ireland, and the dominions and territories thereunto belonging...
Page 558 - As for nobility in particular persons, it is a reverend thing to see an ancient castle or building not in decay, or to see a fair timber tree sound and perfect. How much more to behold an ancient noble family, which hath stood against the waves and weathers of time.
Page 562 - Majestie, he sent mee for my mother to come to take leave of him ; who, bringing with her some raysings, almonds, and other sweet meats, which, shee presenting to him, some whereof hee was pleased to eat, and some took with him ; afterwards, wee all kneeling down, and praying Almighty God to bless, prosper, and preserve him, hee was pleased to salute my mother, and give her thanks for his kind entertainment, and then giving his hand to Mr. Huddleston and...
Page 459 - Near this place (Dorking) the Hon. Charles Howard, of Norfolk, hath very ingeniously contrived a long hope* (ie according to Virgil, Deductus -oallis) in the most pleasant and delightful solitude, for house, gardens, orchards, boscages, &c.
Page 271 - I hope we are all Englishmen, and not to be frightened out of our duty by a few hard words.
Page 109 - The secretary would have engaged farther with me in a dispute about religion. I told him, he was an ancient man, and that they had been a long time there upon their business, and if he would be pleased to dismiss us then, and appoint what time we should some morning wait upon him, we would, if he pleased, spend an hour or two with him in discourse about religion. Upon which he took off his hat, and thanked me kindly for my civility ; but we heard no more of him about the dispute.
Page 275 - OF PERSONS NAMES WHO WERE FIT AND QUALIFIED TO BE MADE KNIGHTS OF THE ROYAL OAK, WITH THE VALUE OF THEIR ESTATES, ANNO DOM. 1660.
Page xvii - Galway (she died 1826) ; succeeded his father in the Irish Peerage in 1801 ; is a Grandee of Portugal, and a Knight Grand Cross of the Portuguese Order of the Tower and Sword...
Page 392 - ... all the Blairs in the south and west country ; but another family of the same name, who settled in the north, in the counties of Fife, Perth, and Angus, namely, Blair of Balthyock, always competed for the chiefship, till at last James VI., than whom none more fit to decide a question of this kind, determined " that the oldest man for the time being, of either family, should have the precedency.
Page 515 - Devonshire. In 1597 he was translated to Worcester, and was likewise made one of the queen's council for the marches of Wales...

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