The New Jamaica: Describing the Island, Explaining Its Conditions of Life and Growth and Discussing Its Mercantile Relations and Potential Importance; Adding Somewhat in Relation to Those Matters which Directly Interest the Tourist and the Health Seeker (Google eBook)

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Kingston, A. W. Gardner, 1890 - Jamaica - 243 pages
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Page 27 - The continuing surplus accrues from no increase of taxation, and is in the face of a large expenditure on public works of utility and importance, of a largely increasing expenditure on such departments as those of education and medicine, and of some increase of expenditure in those administrative and revenue departments which necessarily require development as the population and wealth of the colony become developed.
Page 135 - They began their overt acts by stoning the Volunteers who were drawn up in front of the Court House (a disturbance having been anticipated) and Captain Hitchins was struck on the forehead. The Riot Act was read and the Volunteers fired, but they were soon overpowered. A hand-to-hand struggle ensued during which Captain Hitchins, faint from the loss of blood, rested on the knee of a Volunteer the rifle he had taken from a murdered comrade, and fired his two remaining rounds of ammunition. He was then...
Page 25 - Another Act was also passed in the same session declaring "that it shall be lawful for Her Majesty the Queen to create and constitute a government for this island in such form and with such powers as to Her Majesty might best seem fitting and from time to time to alter or amend such government".
Page 24 - It declared in substance that the disturbances had their immediate origin in a planned resistance to authority, arising partly out of a desire to obtain the land free of rent, and partly out of the want of confidence felt by the labouring class in the tribunals by which most of the disputes affecting their interests were decided; that the disturbance spread rapidly, and that Mr.
Page 24 - ... used such an instrument for the torturing of his fellow-creatures." The Commissioners summed up their Report by declaring that the punishments inflicted were excessive; that the punishment of death was unnecessarily frequent; that the floggings were reckless, and in some cases positively barbarous; that the burning of one thousand houses was wanton and cruel.
Page 154 - The fort and barracks are conspicuous object« from the offing. Navigators strange to the locality sometimes find it difficult to distinguish the entrance to the harbour, and if a vessel should approach the shore to the eastward of it the remains of some old sugar works at Anchovy in ruins might be taken for the old fort at Titchfield and prove misleading, but by running along the land, the place, when once opened, cannot be mistaken. A...
Page 142 - The Riot Act was read and the Volunteers fired, but they were soon overpowered. A hand-to-hand struggle ensued, during which Captain Hitchins, faint from the loss of blood, rested on the knee of a Volunteer the rifle he had taken from a murdered comrade and fired his two remaining rounds of ammunition. He was then surrounded and hacked to death. All the officers and many of the members of the Volunteer Corps nobly died at their post, gallantly doing their duty. The Gustos of the Parish, the Curate...
Page 37 - MONTHS. Sloan's Natural History of Jamaica, says : " Generally speaking, the two great rainy seasons are in May and October." During the winter months of December, January and February, and March, which is worse than either of the others at home, the weather is continuously fine. I was on the island thirty days this winter and saw but one slight shower, which did not extend over a half mile of area, and lasted fifteen minutes.
Page 40 - For a full discussion of this subject the reader is referred to volume II.
Page 22 - Moved by Mr. Robert Wiltshire, seconded by Mr. JB Armstrong, "BesolTed 15th— That in keeping with the foregoing resolutions, this meeting calls upon all the descendants of Africa in every parish throughout the island, to form themselves into societies and hold public meetings, and co-operate for the purpose of setting forth their grievances, especially now, when our philanthropic friends in England are leading the way.

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