The constituion violated, an essay by the author of the Memoir of John Grey of Dilston (Google eBook)

Front Cover
1871
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 88 - My Lords, we are called upon as members of this House, as men, as Christian men, to protest against such notions standing near the Throne, polluting the ear of Majesty. "That God and nature put into our hands!
Page 31 - No FREEMAN SHALL BE TAKEN OR IMPRISONED, OR DISSEISED, OR OUTLAWED, OR BANISHED, OR ANY WAYS DESTROYED, NOR WILL WE PASS UPON HIM, NOR WILL WE SEND UPON HIM, UNLESS BY THE LAWFUL JUDGMENT OF HIS PEERS, OR BY THE LAW OF THE LAND.
Page 146 - And, lastly, to vindicate these rights when actually violated or attacked, the subjects of England are entitled, in the first place, to the regular administration and free course of justice in the courts of law ; next, to the right of petitioning the king and parliament for redress of grievances ; and, lastly, to the right of having and using arms for self-preservation and defence.
Page 187 - My Indian Journal, Containing descriptions of the principal Field Sports of India, with Notes on the Natural History and Habits of the Wild Animals of the Country. By COLONEL WALTER CAMPBELL, author of 'The Old Forest Ranger.
Page 187 - The Old Forest Ranger.' 8vo, with Illustrations, price 16s, Popular Tales of the "West Highlands, Orally Collected, with a translation by JF CAMPBELL. 4 vols. extra fcap. cloth, 32s. Inaugural Address at Edinburgh, April 2, 1866, by THOMAS CARLYLE, on being Installed as Rector of the University there.
Page 89 - And I again call upon your lordships, and the united powers of the state, to examine it thoroughly and decisively, and to stamp upon it an indelible stigma of the public abhorrence. And I again implore those holy prelates of our religion, to do away these iniquities from among us. Let them perform a lustration ; let them purify this House and this country from this sin.
Page 42 - It is the most transcendent privilege which any subject can enjoy or wish for, that he cannot be affected either in his property, his liberty, or his person, but by the unanimous consent of twelve of his neighbors and equals.
Page 174 - It covers the surface of society with a network of small, complicated rules, minute and uniform, through which the most original minds and the most energetic characters cannot penetrate, to rise above the crowd. The will of man is not shattered, but softened, bent, and guided; men are seldom forced by it to act, but they are constantly restrained from acting. Such a power does not destroy, but it prevents existence; it does not tyrannize...
Page 88 - I know not what ideas that lord may entertain of God and nature, but I know that such abominable principles are equally abhorrent to religion and humanity. What...
Page 36 - K choose to give it ; but their verdict must besides comprehend the whole matter in trial, and decide as well upon the fact as upon the point of law that may arise out of it : in other words, they must pronounce both on the commission of a certain fact, and on the reason which makes such...

Bibliographic information