The World of Odysseus

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New York Review of Books, 1954 - History - 205 pages
16 Reviews
The World of Odysseus is a concise and penetrating account of the society that gave birth to the Iliad and the Odyssey--a book that provides a vivid picture of the Greek Dark Ages, its men and women, works and days, morals and values. Long celebrated as a pathbreaking achievement in the social history of the ancient world, M.I. Finley's brilliant study remains, as classicist Bernard Knox notes in his introduction to this new edition, "as indispensable to the professional as it is accessible to the general reader"--a fundamental companion for students of Homer and Homeric Greece.
  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - stillatim - LibraryThing

Ah, for the golden age of academic writing. Is it beautiful? No. But it is clear, concise and argumentative. No 'pointing out a problem' stuff here; Finley just gives you the answers as he sees them ... Read full review

Review: The World of Odysseus

User Review  - Bob - Goodreads

Actually I give it 3.5 stars, but it is worth reading. Questions about what world "Homer" was describing are answered and the answers are interesting. Read full review

Contents

Homer and the Greeks
5
Bards and Heroes
18
Wealth and Labor
46
Household Kin and Community
71
Morals and Values
109
The World of Odysseus Revisited
147
Schliemanns TroyOne Hundred Years After
166
Bibliographical Essay
187
Index of Passages Quoted
197
General Index
201
Copyright

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About the author (1954)

M. I. Finley, who died in 1986, was Professor of Ancient History and Master of Darwin College at Cambridge University. Ian Morris is the Jean and Rebecca Willard Professor in Classics and Chair of the Classics Department at Stanford University.

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