Correspondence & conversations of Alexis de Tocqueville with Nassau William Senior from 1834 to 1859, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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H.S. King & co., 1872 - France
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Page 93 - the people had nothing to do with the laws but to obey them," and his sentiment was loudly applauded.
Page 32 - I believe that our social edifice will continue to rest on its present basis, because no one, even if he wish to change its foundation, can point out another. But yet the state of public feeling disturbs me. The middle classes, cajoled and bribed for the last seventeen years by the Government, have gradually assumed towards the rest of the nation the position of a little aristocracy, and without its higher feelings; one feels ashamed of being led by such a vulgar and corrupt aristocracy; and if this...
Page 9 - ... countrymen, in perils by the heathen, in perils in the city, in perils in the wilderness, in perils in the sea, in perils among false brethren ; In weariness and painfulness, in watchings often, in hunger and thirst, in fastings often, in cold and nakedness. Beside those things that are without, that which cometh upon me daily, the care of all the churches.
Page 223 - Whom,' said Ampere to Tocqueville, ' do you put highest ? ' ' Voltaire,' answered Tocqueville. ' Nothing can exceed the clearness, the finesse, the gaiety, and yet the simplicity of his style. He had a right to answer, as he did, to a lady who talked to him about the beauty of his phrases, " Madame, je n'ai jamais fait une phrase de ma vie.
Page 142 - Tocqueville). He is of a different breed his father, if he had one, is Chenier, but one might almost say that he is ex se ipso natus. When he entered the poetical world, all men's minds were heaving with the revolution. It had filled them with vague conceptions and undefined wishes, to which Lamartine, without making them distinct enough to show their emptiness or their inconsistency, gave something like form or colour. His Meditations . . . seemed to express thoughts of which everyone was conscious,...
Page 137 - August 25, 1850. Tocqueville, AB, and I took a long walk over the downs commanding the sea. " I am now forty-six," said Tocqueville, " and the changes which have taken place in the habits of society, as I faintly recollect my boyhood, seem to have required centuries. " The whole object of those among whom I was brought up, was to amuse, and be amused. Politics were never talked of, and I believe very little thought of. Literature was one of the standing subjects of conversation. Every new book of...
Page 13 - The Report of the Poor Law Commissioners, or at least 3/4ths of it, was written by me, and all that was not written by me was re-written by me. The greater part of the Act, founded on it was also written by me; and in fact I am responsible for the effects, good or evil . . . ', Levy, Nassau W.
Page 141 - In the 18th century competition had begun: it had become difficult to be original by matter, so men tried to strike by style; to clearness and brevity, ornament was added soberly and in good taste, but yet it betrayed labor and effort.
Page 141 - If I were to give a Scriptural genealogy of our modern popular writers, I should say that Rousseau lived twenty years, and then begat Bernardin de St. Pierre ; that Bernardin de St. Pierre lived twenty years, and then begat Chateaubriand ; that Chateaubriand lived twenty years, and then begat Victor Hugo ; and that Victor Hugo, being tempted of the devil, is begetting every day.
Page 291 - LIFE AND WORKS OF THE REV. FRED. W. ROBERTSON. NEW AND CHEAPER EDITIONS. LIFE AND LETTERS OF THE LATE REV. FRED. W. ROBERTSON, MA Edited by STOPFORD BROOKE, MA, Hon. Chaplain in Ordinary to the Queen. Library Edition, in demy 8vo, with Steel Portrait.

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