The Cambridge Companion to Quine

Front Cover
Roger F. Gibson
Cambridge University Press, Mar 29, 2004 - Philosophy - 323 pages
0 Reviews
The eleven essays in this volume cover all the central topics of W.V. Quine's philosophy. Quine (1908-2000) was perhaps the most distinguished analytic philosopher of the later half of the twentieth century. His celebrated attack on the analytic/synthetic tradition heralded a major shift away from the views of language descended from logical positivism. His most important book, Word and Object, introduced the concept of indeterminacy of radical translation, a bleak view of the nature of the language with which we ascribe thoughts and beliefs to ourselves and others.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Aspects of Quines Naturalized Epistemology
19
Quine on the Intelligibility and Relevance of Analyticity
47
Quines Meaning Holisms
65
Underdetermination of Physical Theory
91
Quine on Reference and Ontology
115
Indeterminacy of Translation
151
Quines Behaviorism cum Empiricism
181
Quine on Modality
200
Quine and Logical Positivism
214
Quine and Logic
270
Quine on Quine
287
Selected Bibliography
295
Index
309
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

Ordinary Objects
Amie Thomasson
Limited preview - 2007
All Book Search results »

About the author (2004)

Roger F. Gibson, Jr., is Professor of Philosophy at Washington University in St. Louis. He is the editor of "The Cambridge Companion to Quine" and coeditor of "Perspectives on Quine".