Revolution in Texas: How a Forgotten Rebellion and Its Bloody Suppression Turned Mexicans Into Americans

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Yale University Press, May 12, 2005 - History - 260 pages
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In Revolution in Texas Benjamin Johnson tells the little-known story of one of the most intense and protracted episodes of racial violence in United States history. In 1915, against the backdrop of the Mexican Revolution, the uprising that would become known as the Plan de San Diego began with a series of raids by ethnic Mexicans on ranches and railroads. Local violence quickly erupted into a regional rebellion. In response, vigilante groups and the Texas Rangers staged an even bloodier counterinsurgency, culminating in forcible relocations and mass executions.

Faced with the overwhelming forces arrayed against it, the uprising eventually collapsed. But, as Johnson demonstrates, the rebellion resonated for decades in American history. Convinced of the futility of using force to protect themselves against racial discrimination and economic oppression, many Mexican Americans elected to seek protection as American citizens with equal access to rights and protections under the U.S. Constitution.

  

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Revolution in Texas: how a forgotten rebellion and its bloody suppression turned Mexicans into Americans

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In 1915, the Mexican revolution spilled over into south Texas in the guise of a rebellion against Anglo domination and discrimination known as the Plan de San Diego. Drawing on archives and ... Read full review

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Contents

Conquest
7
Trouble in Mind
38
The Promise of the Revolution
55
Rebellion
71
Repression
108
Citizenship at War
144
Legacies
176
Afterword
206
High Tide of the Plan de San Diego August September 1915
213
Notes
215
Acknowledgments
243
Index
247
Copyright

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Page 3 - Express (September 1 1, 1915) reported that the "finding of dead bodies of Mexicans, suspected for various reasons of being connected with the troubles, has reached a point where it creates little or no interest. It is only when a raid is reported, or an American is killed that the ire of the people is aroused.

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About the author (2005)

Benjamin Heber Johnson is assistant professor of history at Southern Methodist University.

 

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