The Life of William Shakespeare: Including Many Particulars Respecting the Poet and His Family Never Before Published (Google eBook)

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J. R. Smith, 1848 - Dramatists, English - 336 pages
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Page 152 - Sweet Swan of Avon ! what a sight it were To see thee in our waters yet appear, And make those flights upon the banks of Thames, That so did take Eliza, and our James...
Page 128 - And though this, probably the first essay of his poetry, be lost, yet it is said to have been so very bitter, that it redoubled the prosecution against him to that degree that he was...
Page 183 - I remember, the players have often mentioned it as an honour to Shakespeare, that in his writing (whatsoever he penned) he never blotted out a line. My answer hath been, Would he had blotted a thousand.
Page 128 - Upon his leaving school, he seems to have given entirely into that way of living which his father proposed to him ; and, in order to settle in the world after a family manner, he thought fit to marry while he was yet very young. His wife was the daughter of one Hathaway, said to have been a substantial yeoman in the neighbourhood of Stratford.
Page 135 - O, for my sake do you with Fortune chide, The guilty goddess of my harmful deeds, That did not better for my life provide Than public means which public manners breeds. Thence comes it that my name receives a brand, And almost thence my nature is subdued To what it works in, like the dyer's hand.
Page 189 - As Epius Stolo said that the Muses would speake with Plautus tongue, if they would speak Latin; so I say that the Muses would speak with Shakespeares fine filed phrase, if they would speake English.
Page 146 - I am as sorry as if the original fault had been my fault, because myself have seen his demeanour no less civil than he excellent in the quality he professes: besides, divers of worship have reported his uprightness of dealing which argues his honesty, and his facetious grace in writing, that approves his art.
Page 197 - At our feast wee had a play called 'twelve Night, or what you will'; much like the commedy of errores, or Menechmi in Plautus, but most like and neere to that in Italian called Inganni. A good practise in it to make the Steward...
Page 144 - And thou no less deserving than the other two, in some things rarer, in nothing inferior; driven (as myself) to extreme shifts, a little have I to say to thee: and were it not an idolatrous oath, I would swear by sweet S. George, thou art unworthy better hap, sith * thou dependest on so mean a stay.
Page 85 - Avon, one Combes, an old rich usurer, was to be buryed, he makes there this extemporary epitaph, Ten in the hundred the Devill allowes, But Combes will have twelve, he sweares and vowes : If any one askes who lies in this tombe, ' Hoh ! ' quoth the Devill,

References from web pages

Mr. William Shakespeare and the Internet: the blog: License to Play
Since it is sometimes difficult to find a text of the license, I reproduce it here, taken from Halliwell-Phillipps, The Life of William Shakespeare, 1848, ...
mrshakespeare.typepad.com/ mrshakespeare/ 2007/ 12/ license-to-play.html

Shakespeare's Editors - Lewis Theobald
transparentfill.gif (65 bytes). Lewis Theobald (1688 - 1744). "As there are very few pages in Shakespear, upon which some Suspicions of Depravity do not ...
shakespeare.palomar.edu/ Editors/ Theobald.htm

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