The Confessions, Part 1, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Maria Boulding, John E. Rotelle
New City Press, 1997 - Religion - 416 pages
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“Maria Boulding’s version is of a different level of excellence from practically anything else on the market. She has perfected an elegant and flowing style.”
Rowan Williams
Archbishop of Canterbury


The Confessions of Saint Augustine is considered the all time number one Christian classic. It is an extended poetic, passionate, intimate prayer. Augustine was probably forty-three when he began this endeavor. He had been a baptized Catholic for ten years, a priest for six and a bishop for only two. His pre-baptismal life raised questions in the community. Was his conversion genuine? The first hearers were captivated, as many millions have been over the following sixteen centuries. His experience of God speaks to us across time with little need of transpositions. This new translation masterfully captures his experience.

“So old and yet so new! This contemporary translation of Augustine's Confessions was like meeting an old friend and touching perennial truth, despite the passing years. Augustine was surely larger than life--and this translation matches it.”
Richard Rohr, o.f.m.
  

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Review: The Confessions (Works of Saint Augustine)

User Review  - P. Chase Sears - Christianbook.com

When a person is reading Augustines confessions he or she may notice the unique writing style used. The book is like reading journal entries throughout Augustines life. You could describe his writing ... Read full review

The works of Saint Augustine: a translation for the 21st century

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

The latest volume in the series "Augustine for the Twenty-First Century," which will offer the first complete translation of all of Augustine's works into English, adds yet another vision of the ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
Chronological Outline of Augustines Life for the Period Covered by
Student Years at Carthage
Augustine the Manichee
Faustus at Carthage Augustine to Rome and Milan
Progress Friends Perplexities
NeoPlatonism Frees Augustines Mind
Conversion
Death and Rebirth
Memory
Time and Eternity
Heaven and Earth
The Days of Creation Prophecy of the Church
Index of Scripture
Index
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

Saint Augustine was born to a Catholic mother and a pagan father on November 13, 354, at Thagaste, near Algiers. He studied Latin literature and later taught rhetoric in Rome and Milan. He originally joined the Manicheans, a religious sect, but grew unhappy with some of their philosophies. After his conversion to Christianity and his baptism in 387, Augustine developed his own approach to philosophy and theology, accommodating a variety of methods and different perspectives. He believed that the grace of Christ was indispensable to human freedom, and he framed the concepts of original sin and just war. His thoughts greatly influenced the medieval worldview. One of Augustine's major goals was a single, unified church. He was ordained a priest in 391 and appointed Bishop of Hippo, in Roman Africa, in 396. Augustine was one of the most prolific Latin authors in terms of surviving works, and the list of his works consists of more than one hundred separate titles. His writings and arguments with other sects include the Donatists and the Pelagians. On the Trinity, The City of God, and On Nature and Grace are some of his important writings. Confessions, which is considered his masterpiece, is an autobiographical work that recounts his restless youth and details the spiritual experiences that led him to Christianity. Many of Augustine's ideas, such as those concerning sin and predestination, became integral to the doctrines of the Roman Catholic Church. In the Catholic Church he is a saint and pre-eminent Doctor of the Church, and the patron of the Augustinians. He is the patron saint of brewers, printers, and theologians. Augustine died on August 28, 430.

Maria Boulding is a Benedictine nun of Stanbrook Abbey in England, and currently lives as a hermit. She is the author of Marked for Life: Prayer in the Easter Christ; The Coming of God; and Gateway to Hope: An Exploration of Failure. She serves on the advisory board for the ASaint Augustine: A Translation for the Twenty-first CenturyA series.

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