Memoirs of the public and private life of John Howard, the philanthropist (Google eBook)

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T. and G. Underwood, 1823 - Philanthropists - 657 pages
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Page 541 - O my God, I am ashamed and blush to lift up my face to thee, my God : for our iniquities are increased over our head, and our trespass is grown up unto the heavens.
Page 559 - As for me, I will behold thy face in righteousness: I shall be satisfied, when I awake, with thy likeness.
Page 362 - I cannot name this gentleman without remarking, that his labours and writings have done much to open the eyes and hearts of mankind. He has visited all Europe, not to survey the sumptuousness of palaces, or the stateliness of temples ; not to make accurate measurements of the remains of ancient grandeur, nor to form a scale of the curiosity of modern art ; not to collect medals, or...
Page 519 - An Account of the principal Lazarettos in Europe ; with various Papers relative to the Plague ! together with further observations on some Foreign Prisons and Hospitals, and additional Remarks on the present state of those in Great Britain and Ireland.
Page 211 - I was fully convinced that many more prisoners were destroyed by it than were put to death by all the public executions in the kingdom...
Page 532 - The spirits of the good, who bend from high Wide o'er these earthly scenes their partial eye, When first, array'd in...
Page 362 - ... but to dive into the depths of dungeons; to plunge into the infection of hospitals; to survey the mansions of sorrow and pain; to take the...
Page 610 - MASTERS, give unto your servants that which is just and equal ; knowing that ye also have a Master in heaven.
Page 257 - For the correction and instruction of profligate youth, that they who when idle were injurious, may when taught become useful to the State.
Page 601 - The moment of finishing his plans in deliberation, and commencing them in action, was the same. I wonder what must have been the amount of that bribe, in emolument or pleasure, that would have detained him a week inactive after their final adjustment. The law which carries water down a declivity, was not more unconquerable and invariable than the determination of his feelings toward the main object.

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