Assumed Identity

Front Cover
Eagle Large Print, Dec 1, 1994 - Fiction - 670 pages
17 Reviews
From the author of The Covenant of the Flame and The Fifth Profession. Brendan Buchanan is an undercover intelligence operative who has impersonated more than 200 people in the last eight years. But now his multi-personality occupation threatens to destroy him.

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Review: Assumed Identity

User Review  - W. Nicol - Goodreads

This story rattles along at an astounding pace; very enjoyable as long as one doesn't pause to examine the credibility of either plot or characters. Read full review

Review: Assumed Identity

User Review  - Greer Andjanetta - Goodreads

What could have been a good story is spoiled by inferior writing. Much of the story takes place in Yucatan but the author manages to give the impression that he maybe spent a week there and decided to ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
5
Section 3
30
Copyright

25 other sections not shown

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About the author (1994)

David Morrell, an award-winning Canadian writer of horror fiction, was born in 1943 in Kitchener, Ontario, Canada. He was educated at the University of Waterloo and earned his Ph.D. from Pennsylvania State University. Morrell is best known as the creator of John Rambo, the hero of his first novel, First Blood. The novel was adapted for screen and starred Sylvester Stallone. Although Morrell was not happy with the depiction of the Rambo character in the movie, he did write several sequels to First Blood and two further scripts for the sequels to the original movie. He also wrote a number of other books including The Brotherhood of the Rose which became a best seller in 1984. David Morrell has written one scholarly work, John Barth: An Introduction, published by Pennsylvania State University in 1977 and has taught at the University of Iowa. He now lives in the United States with his wife and daughter (another child, a son, is deceased).

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