An Encyclopaedia of Occultism (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Cosimo, Inc., Sep 1, 2006 - Body, Mind & Spirit - 440 pages
0 Reviews
This "compendium of information on the occult sciences, occult personalities, psychic science, demonology, spiritism, and mysticism" was one of a kind when it was first published in 1920 and is still considered the best in its field today. Spence organizes a world's worth of magic -- from "Ab" (a magical month in the ancient Semitic calendar) to "Zulu witch-finders" -- into 2,500 dictionary-style entries that explore concepts and personalities both familiar (Freemasonry, Morgan le Fay) and obscure: palingenesy (a process by which plants or vegetables are destroyed and then "resurrected"), Leonora Galigai (a 17th-century Italian aristocrat who was burned as a witch). A delight for devotees of the weird and the strange, and a valuable resource for students of mythology and the evolution of scientific thought, this important volume is at home in the libraries of all book lovers. Scottish journalist and folklorist LEWIS SPENCE (1874 -1955) was a Fellow of the Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland, and Vice-President of the Scottish Anthropological and Folklore Society. He published more than 40 works on mythology and the occult, including History of Atlantis, An Introduction to Mythology, and Myth and Ritual in Dance, Game and Rhyme.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

I
1
II
57
III
83
IV
112
V
133
VI
154
VII
176
VIII
199
XIII
257
XIV
285
XV
298
XVI
312
XVII
334
XIX
344
XX
398
XXI
424

IX
223
X
234
XI
240
XII
244
XXII
437
XXIV
438
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2006)

After graduating from Edinburgh University he pursued a career in journalism. In 1899 he married Helen Bruce. He was an editor at The Scotsman 1899-1906, editor of The Edinburgh Magazine for a year, 1904-05, then an editor at The British Weekly, 1906-09. In this time his interest was sparked in the myth and folklore of Mexico and Central America, resulting in his popularisation of the Mayan Popul Vuh, the sacred book of the Quiche Mayas (1908). He compiled A Dictionary of Mythology (1910 and numerous additional volumes).

Bibliographic information