Inquiry into the best mode of supplying the city of Boston with water for domestic purposes: in reply to the pamphlets of Mr. Wilkins and Mr. Shattuck ; and also to some of the representations to the committee of the legislature, on the hearing of the petition of the city (Google eBook)

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Eastburn's Press, 1845 - Water-supply - 70 pages
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Page 27 - No. 26.—Liverpool is supplied with water by two public companies, each having an Act of Parliament, which confers upon them a monopoly of supply. One is termed the Bootle Water Company; the other the Liverpool and Harrington Water Company. The former company raise their supply from springs at Bootle, distant from the Exchange three miles, and the latter have wells in various parts of the town. The original shares of...
Page 8 - The establishing of a joint stock company for the supply of a town with water, is the establishing of a monopoly of trading persons, having the power, without responsibility, of taxing the inhabitants for their own benefit. The practical check on any crying excess in their charge, and on their heedlessness about supplying water of a proper quality, lies mainly in the apprehension of a second company being established ; but since no new works can be established without an Act of Parliament, and without...
Page 8 - ... to me to question the policy of allowing water to be supplied to a town by a joint-stock company in any case whatsoever. The extensive pipes laid throughout all the streets, and branching: to most of the houses, cannot conveniently, nor without a great sacrifice of expense, be laid in a second set, much less in a third ; therefore competition, such as occurs in the supply of bread and meat, or of like articles of demand, is out of the question in regard to the supply of water on a large scale....
Page 27 - The original shares of 100Z. in the Bootle Company are now worth, in the market, 380/., and those of the Liverpool and Harrington Company are worth 610/. The charge for supplying water for domestic use is one shilling in the pound on the rental, and it is usually supplied every other day. It therefore follows that had the corporation or the parochial authorities originally supplied the water from the public funds, and no legislative enactment had given to these companies exclusive privileges, that,...
Page 51 - betray its source from some of the streams on which cotton factories are located." The opinion of Dr. Hobbs, the intelligent agent of the Waltham Factory, of the fitness of this water for domestic uses is thus expressed : " Charles River water is soft and excellent for washing. Goods...
Page 8 - ... where the water is supplied, not by a joint stock company, but by the Commissioners of Police, who are elected by the rate-payers, it has often occurred to me to question the policy of allowing water to be supplied to a town by a joint-stock company in any case whatsoever. The extensive pipes laid throughout all the streets, and branching: to most of the houses, cannot conveniently, nor without a great sacrifice of expense, be laid in a second set, much less in a third ; therefore competition,...
Page 14 - I suppose it will be admitted by all who look candidly at this subject, that that part of the City proper lying south of a line drawn through...
Page 7 - ... of united management. It is needless to quote further evidence on this point ; a summary of the whole question seems to us to be contained in the following opinion of Professor Clark of Aberdeen, the justice of which, we think, will be at once evident to all our readers. "Living in a town (Aberdeen) with a population of nearly 70,000 inhabitants, where the water is supplied, not by a joint-stock company, but by the Commissioners of Police, who are elected by the rate-payers, it has often occurred...
Page 28 - ... cent. interest, but supplied from the public rates, and at the net cost. That cost ought only to be the price of raising and distribution ; and in this town, pure water may be' found in every direction, and in superabundance, at an average depth of 120 feet. If we had fountains, at once useful and ornamental, in every direction, as in most of the cities of the continent, and baths in every locality, so that water was free to all, the benefits would soon be perceived.
Page 29 - ... to be the case as to these several hypothetical or scientific deductions, and first as to the actual waste of water ; what is that at your works ? — A judgment may perhaps be best formed as to the small extent of waste from a statement of the actual amount of supply. The actual amount of supply at Nottingham is not more than from 80 to 90 gallons per house per diem ; this is taken by about 8000 tenements and works of every description, amongst which are breweries, dye-works, steam-engines,...

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