The Spanish armada ... ; or, The attempt of Philip ii. and pope Sixtus v. to re-establish popery in England (Google eBook)

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1840
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Page 83 - I am come amongst you as you see at this time, not for my recreation and disport, but being resolved, in the midst and heat of the battle, to live or die amongst you all, to lay down for my God, and for my kingdom, and for my people, my honour and my blood, even in the dust. I know I have the body of a weak and feeble woman, but I have the heart and stomach of a king...
Page 84 - ... by your obedience to my general, by your concord in the camp, and your valour in the field, we shall shortly have a famous victory over those enemies of my God, of my kingdoms, and of my people.
Page 83 - My loving people, we have been persuaded by some that are careful of our safety, to take heed how we commit ourselves to armed multitudes, for fear of treachery. But I assure you, I do not desire to live to distrust my faithful and loving people.
Page 84 - Europe, should dare to invade the borders of my realm; to which, rather than any dishonour shall grow by me, I myself will take up arms; I myself will be your general, judge, and rewarder of every one of your virtues in the field. I know already for your forwardness you have deserved rewards and crowns, and we do assure you, on the word of a prince, they shall be duly paid you.
Page 72 - The ships seemed arranged for a pageant, in honour of a victory already won. Disposed in form of a crescent, the horns of which were seven miles asunder, those gilded, towered, floating castles, with their gaudy standards and their martial music, moved slowly along the channel, with an air of indolent pomp.
Page 100 - With all which so great and terrible an ostentation they did not in all their sailing round about England so much as sink or take one ship, bark, pinnace, or cockboat of ours, or ever burned so much as one sheepcote of this land.
Page 128 - Spain an intention to invade her dominions, and that a principal point of the plot was to prepare a party within the realm that might adhere to the foreigner; and that the seminaries began to blossom and to send forth daily priests and professed men who should by vow taken at shrift reconcile her subjects from their obedience...
Page 24 - She had sent to the relief of the Belgian insurgents an English army under a general, who assumed the title and authority of governor of the revolted provinces, and after a trial, unprecedented in the annals of Europe, she had taken, on a scaffold, the life of the queen of Scots. The first was equivalent to a declaration of war, which Philip could not refuse to notice without the imputation of cowardice : the second was an insult to the majesty of sovereigns, which, as the most powerful of Christian...
Page 151 - He that reigneth on high, to whom is given all power in heaven and in earth, committed one holy Catholic and Apostolic church (out of which there is no salvation) to one alone upon earth namely, to Peter, the Prince of the Apostles, and to Peter's successor, the Bishop of Rome, to be governed in fulness of power. Him alone he made prince over all people, and all kingdoms, to pluck up, to destroy, scatter, consume, plant, and build...
Page 66 - Lord, how long thy servant hath laboured to them for peace, but how proudly they prepare themselves unto battle. Arise, therefore ; maintain thine own cause, and judge thou between her and her enemies. She seeketh not her own honour, but thine...

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