The portrait art. The school of Boiardo. Mediaeval love. Epilogue. Appendix (Google eBook)

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Roberts Brothers, 1884 - Civilization, Medieval
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Page 117 - Gather therefore the Rose whilest yet is prime, For soone comes age that will her pride deflowre ; Gather the Rose of love whilest yet is time, Whilest loving thou mayst loved be with equall crime. He ceast ; and then gan all the quire of birdes Their diverse notes t' attune unto his lay, As in approvaunce of his pleasing wordes.
Page 116 - So passeth, in the passing of a day, Of mortall life the leafe, the bud, the flowre ; Ne more doth florish after first decay, That earst was sought to deck both bed and bowre Of many a lady', and many a Paramowre.
Page 24 - GraecoRoman busts, which is also that of Renaissance portrait sculpture, is that the beauty is quite different in kind from the beauty of Greek ideal sculpture, and obtained by quite different means. It is, essentially, that kind of beauty which I began by saying belonged to realistic art ; to the art which is not squeamish about the object which it represents, but is squeamish about the manner and medium in which that indifferent object is represented ; it is a kind of beauty, therefore, more akin...
Page 181 - Ond' io sovente vado sospirando. Sospiro e sto ['n] rancura , Ch' io son si disioso, E pauroso mi fate penare. Ma tanto m' assicura Lo suo viso amoroso , E lo gioioso riso , e lo sguardare , E lo parlare di quella criatura , Che per paura mi facie penare , 27 E dimorare : tant' fine e pura ! Tanto sagia e cortise , No' credo che pensasse, N distornasse di ci m' impromise. Dala ria giente aprise Da lor nom si stornasse, Ch mi tornasse a danno ch...
Page 7 - Signorelli,turn the wall into a mere badly made frame ; a gigantic piece of cardboard would do as well, and better ; the colours melt into one another, the figures detach themselves at various degrees of relief ; those upon the ceiling and pendentives are frequently upside down ; yet these figures, which are so difficult to see, are worth seeing only in themselves, and not in relation to their position. The masonry is no longer covered, but carved, rendered uneven with the cavities and protrusions...
Page 28 - ... as with a nail the few large strokes of the point which gave the firmness to the strained muscle or stretched skin. Out of this model of his, this plain old burgess, he and his docile friend the light, could make quite a new thing ; a new pattern of .bosses and cavities, of smooth sweeps and hacked lines, of creases and folds of flesh, of pliable linen and rough brocade of dress ; something new, something which, without a single feature being straightened or shortened, yet changed completely...
Page 9 - And the greater the artist, the more cruel the portrait : cruellest in representation of utter spiritual baseness in the two greatest of these idealistic decorators ; Giotto, and his latest disciple, Fra Angelico. Of this I should like to give a couple of examples. In Giotto's frescoes at Santa Croce one of the most lovely pieces of mere architectural decoration conceivable there are around the dying and the dead St. Francis two groups of monks, which are astoundingly realistic. The solemn...
Page 24 - ... into beauty or inanity. But when Greek art had run its course ; when beauty of form had well-nigh been exhausted or begun to pall ; certain artists, presumably Greeks, but working for Romans, began to produce portrait work of quite a new and wonderful sort : the beautiful portraits of ugly old men, of snub little boys, work which was clearly before its right time, and was swamped by idealized portraits, insipid, nay, inane, from the elegant revivalist busts of Hadrian and Marcus Aurelius down...
Page 28 - Renaissance sculptor knew where his work would be placed ; he could calculate the effect of the light falling invariably through this or that window ; he could make a fellow-workman of that light, present for it to draw or to obliterate what features he liked, bid it sweep away such or such surfaces with a broad stream, cut them with a deep shadow, caress their smooth chiselling or their rough grainings, mark as with a nail the few large strokes of the point which gave the firmness to the strained...
Page 12 - ... love and belief ; the condition of mind of St. Francis, St. Catherine of Siena, Madame Guyon : it is the revelation of the great tragedy of heaven to the soul of the mystic. Now, how does Fra Angelico represent this ? A row of saints, founders of orders, kneel one behind the other, and by their side stand apostles and doctors of the Church, admitting them to the sight of the superhuman, with the gesture, the bland, indifferent vacuity of the Cameriere Segreto or Monsignore who introduces a troop...

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