Shakespeare's Tragedy of Coriolanus (Google eBook)

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American book Company, 1909 - 341 pages
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Page 252 - I must have liberty Withal, as large a charter as the wind, To blow on whom I please...
Page 335 - I will ask him for my place again ; he shall tell me I am a drunkard ! Had I as many mouths as Hydra, such an answer would stop them all. To be now a sensible man, by and by a fool, and presently a beast! O strange! Every inordinate cup is unblessed and the ingredient is a devil.
Page 337 - Methought I heard a voice cry, Sleep no more ! Macbeth does murder sleep, the innocent sleep ; Sleep, that knits up the ravell'd sleave of care, The death of each day's life, sore labour's bath, Balm of hurt minds, great nature's second course, Chief nourisher in life's feast ; Lady M.
Page 337 - Sleep no more! Macbeth does murder sleep" the innocent sleep, Sleep that knits up the ravell'd sleave of care; The death of each day's life, sore labour's bath, Balm of hurt minds, great Nature's second course, Chief nourisher in life's feast Lady M. What do you mean? Macb. Still it cried "Sleep no more!
Page 160 - I'll never Be such a gosling to obey instinct, but stand, As if a man were author of himself And knew no other kin.
Page 334 - Reputation, reputation, reputation ! O, I have lost my reputation ! I have lost the immortal part of myself, and what remains is bestiaL My reputation, lago, my reputation ! IAGO.
Page 32 - What would you have, you curs, That like nor peace nor war ? the one affrights you, The other makes you proud. He that trusts to you, Where he should find you lions, finds you hares ; Where foxes, geese : you are no surer, no, Than is the coal of fire upon the ice, Or hailstone in the sun.
Page 269 - Well, Dauphine, you have lurch'd your friends of the better half of the garland, by concealing this part of the plot: but much good do it thee, thou deserv'st it, lad.
Page 135 - I lov'd the maid I married; never man Sigh'd truer breath ; but that I see thee here, Thou noble thing ! more dances my rapt heart Than when I first my wedded mistress saw Bestride my threshold.
Page 10 - The language of poetry naturally falls in with the language of power.

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