The Riverside Milton

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Houghton Mifflin, 1998 - Literary Collections - 1213 pages
14 Reviews

The first one-volume anthology of John Milton's complete poetry and selected prose to be published in over 30 years, The Riverside Milton reflects the highest quality and most current scholarship. As editor of The Milton Quarterly for 30 years, Roy Flannagan is uniquely qualified to survey Milton's work. Pedagogy includes a comprehensive index designed to help students from undergraduate to graduate levels conceive paper topics; factual introductions; extensive annotations with references; margin definitions; and a chronology.

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Review: The Riverside Milton

User Review  - Corey - Goodreads

I hate Milton. Read full review

Review: The Riverside Milton

User Review  - Jeremy - Goodreads

Read for Dr. Donnelly's Milton course at Baylor (Spring 2014). Read full review

Contents

Poems
31
Poems published first in 1673 Poems
246
Uncollected Poems from Manuscripts
289
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

John Milton, English scholar and classical poet, is one of the major figures of Western literature. He was born in 1608 into a prosperous London family. By the age of 17, he was proficient in Latin, Greek, and Hebrew. Milton attended Cambridge University, earning a B.A. and an M.A. before secluding himself for five years to read, write and study on his own. It is believed that Milton read evertything that had been published in Latin, Greek, and English. He was considered one of the most educated men of his time. Milton also had a reputation as a radical. After his own wife left him early in their marriage, Milton published an unpopular treatise supporting divorce in the case of incompatibility. Milton was also a vocal supporter of Oliver Cromwell and worked for him. Milton's first work, Lycidas, an elegy on the death of a classmate, was published in 1632, and he had numerous works published in the ensuing years, including Pastoral and Areopagitica. His Christian epic poem, Paradise Lost, which traced humanity's fall from divine grace, appeared in 1667, assuring his place as one of the finest non-dramatic poet of the Renaissance Age. Milton went blind at the age of 43 from the incredible strain he placed on his eyes. Amazingly, Paradise Lost and his other major works, Paradise Regained and Samson Agonistes, were composed after the lost of his sight. These major works were painstakingly and slowly dictated to secretaries. John Milton died in 1674.

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