A Treatise on the small-pox and measles (Google eBook)

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Sydenham Society, 1848 - 212 pages
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Page 82 - There are so many little Arts used by Mountebanks and pretenders to physic, that an entire treatise, had I a mind to write one, would not contain them : but their impudence, and daring boldness is equal to the guilt and inward conviction they have of tormenting and putting persons to pain in their last hours, for no reason at all. Now some of them profess to cure the...
Page 81 - ... should be found, he were failing in one of these qualifications, it were rather to be wished he were wanting in the practical part (I do not mean to be utterly unacquainted with at least some part of it,) than to know nothing at all of the learning of the ancients. For he that is well versed in, and has well digested, the writings of the ancient physicians, will with a little help of practice, easily attain to what others, who are wholly strangers to this branch of learning, can never be able...
Page 82 - I a mind to write one, would not contain them ; but their impudence and daring boldness is equal to the guilt and inward conviction they have of tormenting, and putting persons to pain in their last hours, for no reason at all. Now some of them profess to cure the falling-sickness, and thereupon make an. issue in the hinder part of the head, in form of a cross, and pretend to take something out of the opening, which they held all the while in their hands. Others give out that they can draw snakes...
Page 83 - Some say they take phlegm, or a substance like unto glass, out of the penis or other part of the body, by the conveyance of a pipe, which they hold with water in their mouths. Some pretend that they can contract and collect all the floating humors of the body to one place by rubbing it with winter cherries; which causes a burning...
Page 36 - ... eyes; a heaviness of the whole body; great uneasiness, the symptoms of which are stretching and yawning; a pain in the throat and chest, with a slight difficulty in breathing, and cough; a dryness of the mouth, thick spittle, and hoarseness of the voice; pain and heaviness of the head; inquietude, distress of mind, nausea, and anxiety (with this difference, that the inquietude, nausea, and anxiety are more frequent in the Measles than in the Small-Pox; while, on the other hand, the pain in the...
Page 138 - I should never have thought a philosopher capable of deliberate falsehood in a work represented by him as a scientific treatise, and one which will engage people's hearts in a labour from which they can derive no advantage. I have given you a thousand dinars as a reward for this visit and the trouble you have taken, but I shall assuredly punish you for committing a deliberate falsehood.
Page 84 - ... feather. Many things of this nature do they get out, which these impostors with great dexterity have put in, tending many times to the endangering the health of their patients, and often ending in the death of them. Such counterfeits could not pass with discerning men, but that they did not dream of any fallacies, and made no doubt of the skill of those whom they employed; till at last when they suspect, or rather look more narrowly into their operations, the cheat is discovered.
Page 74 - And if the patient be not relieved upon their eruption, but his condition continues unfavourable after it is finished, it is a mortal sign. And as to those which are of a greenish, or violet, or black colour, they are all of a bad and fatal kind; and when, besides, a swooning and palpitation of the heart come on, they are worse and still more fatal. And when the fever increases after...
Page 36 - When, therefore, you see these symptoms, or some of the worst of them, (such as the pain of the back, and the terrors in sleep, with the continued fever,) then you may be assured that the eruption of one or other of these diseases in the patient is nigh at hand; except that there is not in the Measles so much pain of the back as in the Small-Pox; nor in the Small-Pox so much anxiety and nausea as in the Measles, unless the Small-Pox be of a bad sort; and this shows that the Measles come from a very...
Page 53 - Persians ; though henna, the stain used for that purpose, is here applied freely to the soles of the feet and the palms of the hands...

References from web pages

Mohammad Ibn Zakariya al-al-Razi (865?-925?) : Library of Congress ...
English Title: A treatise on the small-pox and measles, by Abbu Becr Mohammed ibn Zacarbiyba ar-Rbazbi (commonly called Rhazes). ...
www.mala.bc.ca/ ~MCNEIL/ cit/ citlcrazi.htm

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