Deadline (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Harper Collins, Apr 21, 2009 - Juvenile Fiction - 336 pages
71 Reviews

Ben Wolf has big things planned for his senior year. Had big things planned. Now what he has is some very bad news and only one year left to make his mark on the world.

How can a pint-sized, smart-ass seventeen-year-old do anything significant in the nowheresville of Trout, Idaho?

First, Ben makes sure that no one else knows what is going onónot his superstar quarterback brother, Cody, not his parents, not his coach, no one. Next, he decides to become the best 127-pound football player Trout High has ever seen; to give his close-minded civics teacher a daily migraine; and to help the local drunk clean up his act.

And then there's Dallas Suzuki. Amazingly perfect, fascinating Dallas Suzuki, who may or may not give Ben the time of day. Really, she's first on the list.

Living with a secret isn't easy, though, and Ben's resolve begins to crumble . . . especially when he realizes that he isn't the only person in Trout with secrets.

  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - kim.jacobs - LibraryThing

I read this book after my son chose it to read for a school project. The book follows the senior year of Ben Wolf. Ben learns at a routing sports physical that he has a blood disease that will give ... Read full review

Review: Deadline

User Review  - Nate H - Goodreads

This quarter I read the emotion jerker Deadline written by Chris Crutcher. The book is based upon an 18 year old kid named Ben Wolf. Ben is going into his senior year of high school when he is ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
Section 2
Section 3
Section 4
Section 5
Section 6
Section 7
Section 8
Section 12
Section 13
Section 14
Section 15
Section 16
Section 17
Section 18
Section 19

Section 9
Section 10
Section 11
Section 20
Section 21
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Chris Crutcher has written nine critically acclaimed novels, an autobiography, and two collections of short stories. Drawing on his experience as a family therapist and child protection specialist, Crutcher writes honestly about real issues facing teenagers today: making it through school, competing in sports, handling rejection and failure, and dealing with parents. He has won three lifetime achievement awards for the body of his work: the Margaret A. Edwards Award, the ALAN Award, and the NCTE National Intellectual Freedom Award. Chris Crutcher lives in Spokane, Washington.

Bibliographic information