A Working Plan for Forest Lands in Berkeley County, South Carolina (Google eBook)

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U.S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Forestry, 1905 - Forests and forestry - 62 pages
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Page 2 - W. PRICE, in Charge. FOREST MANAGEMENT, THOMAS H. SHERRARD, in Charge. DENDROLOGY, •GEORGE B. SUDWORTH, in Charge. FOREST EXTENSION, WILLIAM L. HALL, in Charge. FOREST PRODUCTS, HERMANN VON SCHRENK, in Charge. RECORDS, JAMES B. ADAMS, in Charge. LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL.
Page 42 - While figures of growth could not be obtained for this species, the few trees the rings of which were counted showed very slow growth from early life to old age. The clear length and height growth of this tree cease very early. (See Table XXI.) After 13 inches in diameter is reached they practically stop increasing. One great reason for this short period of height growth is doubtless the "peck," which causes the trees to become stagheaded.
Page 7 - The total area of all lands controlled is 44,943 acres. Of this 5,243 acres are cultivated and waste lands, and 39,700 acres timbered. On 10,158 acres of the latter the company owns only stumpage. Adverse holdings, aside from those on which stumpage is owned, are insignificant, comprising only a few small lots of from 10 to 100 acres each. Except for these adverse holdings the tract forms a solid block. The land is uniformly flat, but may be divided into uplands and swamps. Small sink holes, or "...
Page 32 - ... would elapse before the grazing would be materially improved. The chief direct damage done by animals is the rooting up of loblolly and longleaf pine seedlings by hogs. Large numbers of seedlings are thus destroyed. But it is certain that the greatest damage done the forest at present is by fire, and, if this be eliminated, grazing can go on without causing noticeable harm. Bui. 56, Forest Service, US Dept. of Agriculture.
Page 47 - River holdings for the application of practical forestry. There is a good present stand of mature timber, and a ready market for it; an excellent young growth develops after lumbering, provided the cut-over lands are protected against fire — a matter which is entirely practicable at a small expense; the cost of logging and transportation to the mill is very low; and the mill itself is thoroughly equipped and remarkably well situated to facilitate a large.and varied output.
Page 27 - FROM FISHBROOK HOLDING. TOTAL YIELD FROM SILKHOPE, EAST, HOLDING. TOTAL YIELD FROM SILKHOPE, WEST, HOLDING. TOTAL YIELD FOR TRACT BY SPECIES. Table VII shows the total number of board feet of lumber over the whole tract by species. This table includes all trees 10 inches and over in diameter breasthigh. It is seen that the stand of loblolly pine exceeds that of all the other species combined. Block No. Cutting limit diameter breasthigb.
Page 38 - Volume of longleaf pine at various periods. RELATION OF AGE TO HEIGHT. (See Table XVIII.) Height growth of longleaf pine is greatest from the tenth to the thirtieth year, but continues to be rapid to the eightieth year. After this it rapidly drops, until at 120 years the tree is growing only onetenth of a foot per year. It continues at about this rate up to two hundred years, after which it practically stops.
Page 36 - SC is required. The shade of tall grass interfer.es with germination but does not prevent it. Loblolly pine reproduces well, provided that sufficient moisture is present and that fire is kept out. Trees begin to bear seed at an early age, especially where there is an abundance of light, but large crops are not borne until a diameter of 10 inches is reached. After this period some seed is borne nearly evenr year, with heavj' crops at intervals of two or three years.
Page 54 - XXVIII shows the amount of timber saved by cutting stumps 1 and 1£ feet high instead of 2 feet, as is done at present. It is seen that for trees of the larger diameters the saving is considerable. It is recommended that all pine stumps be cut not higher than 1£ feet unless the butt of the tree is unsound. With the present distribution of age classes, this would mean a saving of about 5£ million board feet over the whole tract.
Page 57 - ... inches. Loblolly pine, being a tree of very rapid growth and being well suited to the locality, should be" favo.red as much as possible, that its range may be extended. This tree should, so far as possible, replace the cypress and hardwoods, since cypress is too slow growing to be profitable, and the hardwoods are not now and will not be for a long time of much commercial value.

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