An Invitation to Kagura: Hidden Gem of the Traditional Japanese Performing Arts

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David Petersen, Mar 1, 2007 - Art - 376 pages
2 Reviews
Richly illustrated, and based largely on sources inaccessible to the non-Japanese speaker, this book provides a rare glimpse into kagura (Shinto theater), a performance style with roots predating even noh drama. Coverage includes the history of the art; the kagura stage; schools of performance; synopses of plays and ceremonies; movement and choreography; kagura costumes; masks and mask-making; implements, decorations and special effects; the music of kagura; and related folk arts. There are also additional sections with comparative materials on noh and kabuki. A new world of theater awaits...
  

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User Review  - davmandy - LibraryThing

Richly illustrated, and based largely on sources inaccessible to the non-Japanese speaker, this book provides a rare glimpse into kagura (Shinto theater), a performance style with roots predating even ... Read full review

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If you think that Japanese theater ends with Noh, Kabuki, and Bunraku...think again! This "Kagura primer" provides a rare glimpse into the inner workings of the Shinto stage, a performance style with roots predating both Noh and Kabuki.
Come with the author as he ventures along the artistic "road less taken", through Hiroshima and Shimane prefectures. There he documents a dynamic world of folk theater thriving under the radar of mainstream performance studies.
Based largely on sources inaccessible to non-Japanese speakers, and richly illustrated with maps and photographs, this book is a unique introduction to a woefully neglected facet of Japanese culture.
A new world of theater awaits...
 

Contents

II
13
III
43
IV
71
V
113
VI
189
VII
209
VIII
229
IX
251
XII
301
XIII
303
XIV
307
XV
308
XVI
309
XVII
316
XVIII
321
XIX
343

X
271
XI
287

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About the author (2007)

David Petersen, who knew Abbey as a mentor and friend, is the literary editor of the Abbey estate. He lives in Colorado.

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