Poems and letters in prose (Google eBook)

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Page 225 - O MAN ! WHOSOEVER THOU ART, AND WHENSOEVER THOU COMEST (FOR COME I KNOW THOU WILT), I AM CYRUS, THE FOUNDER OF THE PERSIAN EMPIRE, ENVY ME NOT THE LITTLE EARTH THAT COVERS MY BODY.
Page 190 - What better school for manners than the company of virtuous women, where the mutual endeavour to please must insensibly polish the mind, where the example of the female softness and modesty must communicate itself to their admirers, and where the delicacy of that sex puts every one on his guard, lest he give offence by any breach of decency...
Page 186 - Deliberate on all things with thy friend: But since friends grow not thick on every bough, Nor every friend unrotten at the core, First on thy friend deliberate with thyself; Pause, ponder, sift; not eager in the choice, Nor jealous of the chosen: fixing, fix; Judge before friendship, then confide till death.
Page 106 - Whom gentler ftars unite, and in one fate Their hearts, their fortunes, and their beings blend. 'Tis not the coarfer tie of human laws, Unnatural, oft, and foreign to the mind, That binds their peace, but harmony...
Page 33 - And wifiYd, in the decline of life, ' To fee her make a frugal wife.' But while her tutors thus impart, Their precepts never reach'd the heart : For beaus, and belles, and fages tell Her heart on other things...
Page 158 - And to value life, as far as life is good, belongs as much to courage as to discretion. But a wretched life is no wise man's wish. To be without honesty, is, in effect, to be without natural affection or sociableness of any kind. And a life without natural affection, friendship, or sociableness, would be found a wretched one, were it to be tried. It is as these feelings and affections are intrinsically valuable and worthy, that self-interest is to be rated and esteemed. A man is by nothing so much...
Page 35 - She learnt, betimes, to furl the Fan, To laugh, and ogle, with her Man ; Her Drefs, her Air, with ftudious Art, Were taught her Wifhes to impart ; She try 'd by Adion, Word, and Feature, To be a lovely, flirtipg, Creature.
Page 34 - But, while her Tutors thus impart, Their Precepts never reach'd the Heart : For Beaus, and Belles, and...
Page 37 - He gaz'd around ; furvey'd the Fair, Her beauteous Form, her giddy Air ; And while, with Pity, glow'd his Breaft, Thus he his Sentiments exprefs'd.
Page 8 - Where the verdure refreflies the fight ; But frequently paus'd by the way, With apt words to exprefs their delight. To the hill now their walk I purfu'd. Where new...

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