Curiosities [afterw.] Romance of modern travel (Google eBook)

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Page 77 - Soon after the explosion commenced a number of meteorites fell to the ground over an area a mile and a half in length and half a mile in breadth.
Page 100 - His going forth is from the end of the heaven, and his circuit unto the ends of it: ала there is nothing hid from the heat thereof.
Page 95 - ... right arm, and throws your lank shadow over the sand right along on the way for Persia. Then again you look upon his face, for his power is all veiled in his beauty, and the redness of flames has become the redness of roses ; the fair, wavy cloud that fled in the morning now comes to his sight once more comes blushing, yet still comes on comes burning with blushes, yet comes and clings to his side.
Page 13 - Frank dress of course, with his hand placed to his head, wearing spectacles, and with one foot on the ground, and the other raised behind him, as if he were stepping down from a seat. The description was exactly true in every respect: the peculiar position of the hand was occasioned by an almost constant head-ache; and that of the foot or leg, by a stiff knee, caused by a fall from a horse, in hunting.
Page 98 - On the fifth day of my journey the air above lay dead, and all the whole earth that I could reach with my utmost sight and keenest listening was still and lifeless, as some dispeopled and forgotten world that rolls round and round in the heavens through wasted floods of light. The sun, growing fiercer and fiercer, shone down more mightily now than ever on me he shone before, and as I drooped my head under his fire, and closed my eyes against the glare that surrounded me, I slowly fell asleep ...
Page 95 - The beast instantly understood and obeyed the sign, and slowly sunk under me till she brought her body to a level with the ground, then gladly enough I alighted. The rest of the camels were unloaded and turned loose to browse upon the. shrubs of the desert, where shrubs there were, or where these failed, to wait for the small quantity of food that was allowed them out of our stores.
Page 100 - I had lived to see, and I saw them. When evening came I was still within the confines of the Desert, and my tent was pitched as usual, but one of my Arabs stalked away rapidly towards the West without telling me of the errand on which he was bent. After a while he returned : he had toiled on a graceful service ; he had travelled all the way on to the border of the living world, and brought me back for a token an ear of rice, full, fresh, and green.
Page 97 - When the cold, sullen morning dawned, and my people began to load the camels, I always felt loath to give back to the waste this little spot of ground that had glowed for a while with the cheerfulness of a human dwelling. One by one, the cloaks, the saddles, the baggage, the hundred things that strewed the ground and made it look so familiar all these were taken away and laid upon the camels. A speck in the broad tracts of Asia remained still impressed with the mark of patent portmanteaus and...
Page 12 - On one of these occasions an Englishman present, ridiculed the performance, and said that nothing would satisfy him but a correct description of the appearance of his own father, of whom he was sure no one of the company had any knowledge. The boy accordingly having called by name for the person alluded to, described a man in a Frank dress...
Page 88 - I had four camels, one for my baggage, one for each of my servants, and one for myself. Four Arabs, the owners of the camels, came with me on foot. My stores were a small soldier's tent, two bags of dried bread brought from the convent at Jerusalem, and a couple of bottles of wine from the same source, two goatskins filled with water, tea, sugar, a cold tongue, and (of all things in the world) a jar of Irish butter which Mysseri had purchased from some merchant. There was also a small sack of charcoal,...

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