A Journey from Aleppo to Jerusalem, at Easter, A.D. 1697: To which is Added an Account of the Author's Journey to the Banks of the Euphrates at Beer, and to the Country of Mesopotamia (Google eBook)

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S. G. Simpkins, 1836 - Jerusalem - 271 pages
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Page 139 - Behold, he shall come up like a lion from the swelling of Jordan unto the habitation of the strong: but I will make them suddenly run away from her: and who is a chosen man, that I may appoint over her? for who is like me? and who will appoint me the time? and who is that shepherd that will stand before me?
Page 151 - A garden enclosed is my sister, my spouse; a spring shut up, a fountain sealed.
Page 145 - ... a kind of fruit*, which induces me to believe that there may be a greater deceit in this fruit than that which is usually reported of it ; and that its very being as well as its beauty is a fiction, only kept up, as my Lord Bacon observes many * Tacit. Hist., lib. r. ; Joseph. Bell. Jud., lib. v. cap. 5. other false notions are, because it serves for a good allusion, and helps the poet to a similitude.
Page 174 - The corpses are let down into it from the top, there being five holes left open for that purpose. Looking down through these holes we could see many bodies under several degrees of decay, from which it may be conjectured that this grave does not make that quick despatch with the corpses committed to it, which is commonly reported.
Page 199 - On the northwest you discern at a distance the Mediterranean, and all round, you have the spacious and beautiful plains of Esdraelon and Galilee. Turning a little southward, you have in view the high mountains of Gilboa, fatal to Saul and his sons.
Page 97 - We were sufficiently instructed by experience, what the holy Psalmist means by the dew of Hermon, our tents being as wet with it, as if it had rained all night.
Page 44 - It is counted uncivil to visit in this country without an oifering in hand. All great men expect it as a kind of tribute due to their character and authority ; and look upon themselves as affronted, and indeed defrauded, when this compliment is omitted.
Page 59 - Adonis, who was killed by a wild boar in the mountains, out of which this stream rises. Something like this we saw actually come to pass : for the water was stained to a surprising redness ; and, as we observed in travelling, had discoloured the sea a great way into a reddish hue, occasioned doubtless by a sort of minium, or red earth, washed into the river by the violence of the rain, and not by any stain from Adonis's blood.
Page 198 - Master, it is good for us to be here : let us make three tabernacles, one for thee, one for Moses, and one for Elias : not knowing what he said.
Page 190 - They were armed at the lesser end with a sharp prickle for driving the oxen, and at the other with a small spade, or paddle of iron, strong and massy, for cleansing the plough from the clay that encumbers it in working.

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