The German Museum, Or, Monthly Repository of the Literature of Germany, the North and the Continent in General, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
C. Geisweiler and the proprietors
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Page 409 - Like leaves on trees the race of man is found, Now green in youth, now withering on the ground ; Another race the following spring supplies, They fall successive, and successive rise: So generations in their course decay, So flourish these, when those are past away.
Page 409 - With various skill, and high embroidery grac'd. In this was every art, and every charm, To win the wisest, and the coldest warm : Fond love, the gentle vow, the gay desire, The kind deceit, the still-reviving fire, Persuasive speech, and more persuasive sighs, Silence that spoke, and eloquence of eyes.
Page 409 - ACHILLES' wrath, to Greece the direful spring Of woes unnumber'd, heavenly goddess, sing ! That wrath which hurl'd to Pluto's gloomy reign The souls of mighty chiefs untimely slain ; Whose limbs, unburied on the naked shore, Devouring dogs and hungry vultures tore; Since great Achilles and Atrides strove, Such was the sovereign doom, and such the will of Jove.
Page 588 - Now when he had left speaking, he said unto Simon, Launch out into the deep, and let down your nets for a draught.
Page 411 - The verdant fields with those of heav'n may vie, With ether vested, and a purple sky; The blissful seats of happy souls below. Stars of their own, and their own suns, they know; Their airy limbs in sports they exercise, And on the green contend the wrestler's prize.
Page 411 - Then sought his savage kindred in the wood, Where grazing all the day, at night he came To his known lodgings, and his country dame. This household beast, that us'd the woodland grounds.
Page 125 - When Atreus' son harangued the listening train, Just was his sense, and his expression plain, His words succinct, yet full, without a fault; He spoke no more than just the thing he ought. But when Ulysses rose, in thought profound, His modest eyes he fix'd upon the ground...
Page 339 - ... succeeded in detecting the imprudent inn-keeper in the fact. Wolf was imprisoned, and it was with great difficulty, and not without the sacrifice of all his little property, that he obtained a commutation of his punishment. Robert triumphed. His rival was beaten off the field, and Hannah's favour lost for the beggar. Wolf knew his enemy, and this enemy was the happy possessor of his Johanna. A galling sense of his own want, joined to injured pride, poverty and jealousy combined, break in upon...
Page 540 - mid luxuriant groves : Onward they rush, and from alternate blows Dark blood through gushing wounds the earth o'erflows. Front clash'd on front their battering horns rebound, Olympus bellows, and the woods resound. The combat o'er, insatiate rage remains, The vanquish'd exile roams o'er distant plains ; Mourns o'er his shame, and each ignoble scar, That marks th' insulting victor's might in war.
Page 340 - I entered the fortress," said he, " as a strayed sheep, and left it as a finished villain. 1 had still something in the world that was dear to me, and my pride revolted at ignominy. As I was brought to the fortress, I was confined to the same apartment with three and tweniy prisoners, amongst whom were two murderers, the rest were all note*!

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