The Wisdom of Nancy Drew: The Nancy Drew Guide to Solving Life's Little Mysteries

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Cider Mill Press Book Publishers, LLC, 2007 - Juvenile Fiction - 96 pages
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For five decades, girls have idolized Nancy Drew, purchasing millions of books showcasing her adventures. And now, timed to coincide with the release of a major new Nancy Drew film, comes a "Magnetic Wisdom" devoted to the inspirational titian-haired super-sleuth. After all, who better to serve as a role model? Aside from being brilliant, beautiful, and talented, she had an adoring boyfriend and zipped around in a really cute sports car. Inside this wonderful, full-color gift edition are her life lessons, covering everything from etiquette and wilderness tips to advice on mystery-solving. It's got the answer to every predicament in which a young lady could find herself, with tips taken from classic editions of her stories and fabulous reproductions of her most famous covers through the years.

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About the author (2007)

Carolyn Keene was the pseudonym that Mildred Wirt Benson and Walter Karig used to write Nancy Drew books. The idea of Nancy Drew came from Edward Stratemeyer in 1929. He also had other series, that included the Hardy Boys, but he died in 1930 before the Nancy Drew series became famous. His daughters, Harriet and Edna, inherited his company and maintained Nancy Drew having Mildred Wirt Benson, the original Carolyn Keene, as the principal ghostwriter. During the Depression, they asked Benson to take a pay cut and she refused, which is when Karig wrote the books. Karig's Nancy Drew books were Nancy's Mysterious Letter, The Sign of the Twisted Candles, and Password to Larkspur Lane. He was fired from writing more books because of his refusal to honor the request that he keep his work as Carolyn Keene a secret. He allowed the Library of Congress to learn of his authorship and his name appeared on their catalog cards. Afterwards, they rehired Benson and she wrote until her last Nancy Drew book (#30) was written in 1953, Clue of the Velvet Mask. Harriet and Edna Stratemeyer also contributed to the Nancy Drew series. Edna wrote plot outlines for several of the early books and Harriet, who claimed to be the sole author, had actually outlined and edited nearly all the volumes written by Benson. The Stratemeyer Syndicate had begun to make its writers sign contracts that prohibited them from claiming any credit for their works, but Benson never denied her writing books for the series. After Harriet's death in 1982, Simon and Schuster became the owners of the Stratemeyer Syndicate properties and in 1994, publicly recognized Benson for her work at a Nancy Drew conference at her alma mater, the University of Iowa. Now, Nancy Drew has several ghostwriters and artists that have contributed to her more recent incarnations.

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