Main Traveled Roads

Front Cover
Kessinger Publishing, Apr 1, 2005 - Fiction - 308 pages
10 Reviews
div i Main-Travelled Roads /i contains eleven stories in this expanded and revised 1922 edition of an undisputed American classic. "Under the Lion's Paw" shows an honest, hard-working farmer victimized by a greedy landlord. Equally powerful is the semi-autobiographical "Up the Coolly," concerning a successful son who returns from the East to find his mother and brother trapped on a poor farm, defeated in spite of their best efforts. "Mrs. Ripley's Trip" is a tender story of an elderly couple settled in their frugal country ways, with the wife determined to realize her dream of revisiting childhood scenes. br br br br Although Garland paints no pretty pictures, he offers exhilarating moments in the lives of these farm people and never ignores the strength of individual will. br br div William Dean Howells's introduction to the 1922 edition has been retained. /div /div

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Review: Main-Travelled Roads

User Review  - Becky - Goodreads

This was a truly beautiful piece of work from someone that intimately knew and loved the prairie. His words paint vivid beautiful pictures of not only golden flecks of sunlight bouncing through the ... Read full review

Review: Main-Travelled Roads

User Review  - Matt - Goodreads

Interesting perspective on the lives of midwestern farmers of the time. Clearly the work of a talented but young writer. A few more revisions could have improved these stories greatly. Read full review

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About the author (2005)

Hamlin Garland was born and raised on pioneer farms in the upper Midwest, and his earliest and best fiction (most of it collected in Main Travelled Roads, 1891) deals with the unremitting hardship of frontier life---angry, realistic stories about the toil and abuses to which farmers of the time were subjected. As his fiction became more popular and romantic, its quality seriously declined, and Garland is remembered today chiefly for a handful of stories, such as "Under the Lion's Paw" and "Rose of Dutcher's Coolly." His only contribution to literary theory is Crumbling Idols (1894), in which he argued for an art that was truthful, humanitarian, and rooted in a specific locale. The first volume of his autobiography, A Son of the Middle Border (1917), was followed by the much-admired second volume, A Daughter of the Middle Border (1921), which was awarded a Pulitzer Prize. He published several other volumes of reminiscence, all of which are once more available with the reprinting of the 45-volume collection of his works.

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