Apple: The Inside Story of Intrigue, Egomania, and Business Blunders

Front Cover
Harper Collins, Oct 21, 1998 - Business & Economics - 480 pages
2 Reviews
Apple Computer was once a shining example of the American success story. Having launched the personal computer revolution in 1977 with the first all-purpose desktop PC, Apple became the darling of the national business press and Wall Street. Yet by 1995, the company's change-the-world idealism had all but disappeared in a bitter internal struggle between warring camps. Raging internal mistakes, petty infighting, and gross mismanagement became Apple's hallmark, and today the company clings to a mere 3.7 percent share of the market it helped to create. Apple is the spellbinding account of what really went on behind closed doors, revealing the forces that dismantled this once great icon of American business.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

Apple: the inside story of intrigue, egomania, and business blunders

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

How many companies were started in a garage by a couple of whiz kids, went on to a global presence with multibillion dollar sales, and within 20 years came close to bankruptcy? Meet Apple Computer ... Read full review

Review: Apple:: The Inside Story of Intrigue, Egomania, and Business Blunders

User Review  - Andrew Ball - Goodreads

This was one of the most interesting badly-written books I've read. If you can look past the author's tendancy towards caricature there are some fascinating nuggets of information and perhaps even insight buried in here. Read full review

Contents

In the Beginning
3
The Glory Years
20
The Licensing Debate
38
A Noble Village
63
An Engineering Morass
82
The Fall of IeanLouis Cassée
107
Crossing a Canyon
131
Looking for Another Way
154
The March to PowerPC
240
From Power Mac to the Cliff
269
The Wreck of the Diesel
299
Spindlers Last Stand
326
Impossible
365
A Founders Return
394
Thinking Different
429
106
458

Sculleys Waterloo
181
A New Sheriff in Town
215

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1998)

Jim Carlton, a West Coast technology reporter for the Wall Street Journal, has been a journalist for twenty years. He has done numerous expos‚s on questionable practices in the airline, chemical, and computer industries, and has won many investigative and feature-writing awards.

Bibliographic information