Burr

Front Cover
Ballantine Books, May 12, 1986 - Fiction - 564 pages
17 Reviews
"An extraordinarily intelligent and entertaining novel!"
NEWSWEEK
Brilliantly realized, enormously readable, Gore Vidal's #1 best seller paints a fascinating portrait of Aaron Burr, who lived out his long life partly as a suspected traitor and partly as one of the most heroic and colorful of the founding fathers.
A fictional memoir based on actual facts, BURR describes the early struggles and endless intrigues of the United States. Vidal writes with so much drama and vigor that history comes alive, and the concerns of a new nation read like today's headlines.

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Review: Burr (Narratives of Empire #1)

User Review  - Steve - Goodreads

Vidal does a brilliant job of bringing Burr's story to life, using and fleshing out real historical characters to ground his story in a dirty and treacherous America. The fictional narrator is ... Read full review

Review: Burr (Narratives of Empire #1)

User Review  - Bill - Goodreads

'Burr' is the lead novel in Gore Vidal's seven-book series on US history. It's not the first book he wrote in the series, but in terms of historical chronology, everything begins right here. If you've ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
100
Section 3
137
Copyright

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About the author (1986)

Gore Vidal was born Eugene Luther Gore Vidal Jr. on October 3, 1925 at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, New York. He did not go to college but attended St. Albans School in Washington and graduated from Phillips Exeter Academy in New Hampshire in 1943. He enlisted in the Army, where he became first mate on a freight supply ship in the Aleutian Islands. His first novel, Williwaw, was published in 1946 when he was twenty-one years old and working as an associate editor at the publishing company E. P. Dutton. The City and the Pillar was about a handsome, athletic young Virginia man who gradually discovers that he is homosexual, which caused controversy in the publishing world. The New York Times refused to advertise the novel and gave a negative review of it and future novels. He had such trouble getting subsequent novels reviewed that he turned to writing mysteries under the pseudonym Edgar Box and then gave up novel-writing altogether for a time. Once he moved to Hollywood, he wrote television dramas, screenplays, and plays. His films included I Accuse, Suddenly Last Summer with Tennessee Williams, Is Paris Burning? with Francis Ford Coppola, and Ben-Hur. His most successful play was The Best Man, which he also adapted into a film. He started writing novels again in the 1960's including Julian, Washington, D.C., Myra Breckenridge, Burr, Myron, 1876, Lincoln, Hollywood, Live From Golgotha: The Gospel According to Gore Vidal, and The Golden Age. He also published two collections of essays entitled The Second American Revolution, which won the National Book Critics Circle Award for criticism in 1982 and United States: Essays 1952-1992. In 2009, he received the National Book Awards lifetime achievement award. He died from complications of pneumonia on July 31, 2012 at the age of 86.

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