The Sumerians

Front Cover
W. W. Norton & Company, 1965 - History - 198 pages
3 Reviews
In this book Professor Woolley, one of the world's foremost archaeologists, shows quite clearly that when Egyptian civilization began the civilization of the Sumerians had already flourished for at least 2,000 years. The idea that Egypt was the earliest civilization has been entirely exploded. The Sumerians had reached a very high level of culture by 3500 B.C.E., and may be said with some justice to be the forerunners of all the Old World civilizations of Egypt, Assyria, Asia Minor, Crete, and Greece. This book will appeal to everyone interested in the early history of humankind.
  

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What work he did . It is a shame that the Yiddish speaking people today making war all over trying to claim that now the Sumerian who are not them nor Gods but the higher self of the ancient temple .
The Zionist movement is trying to destroy history as the push all the Cainaine out which are Semite really . They say every thing in the world is anti Semite yet none of them are Semite just to sue people .
UR is the home of Adham ram which you say Abraham which means
Abra a town and tribe of Ham
 

Review: The Sumerians

User Review  - David Harrison - Goodreads

An engrossing introduction despite the book's age. Or maybe because of it, as Woolley's preoccupations also say much about his own era. Clearly written and as good a starting point as any for newcomers to ancient Near Eastern history. Read full review

Contents

THE EARLY HISTORY OF SUMER
27
THE PERIOD OF CIVIL WARS
62
SUMERIAN SOCIETY
105
organization of the Empire The Capital of the Empire
130
ISIN AND LARSA
153
Larsa under the Elamite Dynasty The rise of Babylon
170
THE CLAIM OF SUMER pages 181193
183
INDEX
195
Copyright

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About the author (1965)

Sir Charles Leonard Woolley, as leader of the joint expedition of the University of Pennsylvania Museum and the British Museum, directed important excavations on the site of Ur of the Chaldees, a famous city long buried in the desert sand of Mesopotamia.

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